Foreign Pilots work in the US

#1
Hey guys, I had some issues here. As my topic had explained some part of it, I heard some rumors from my instructors and friends who flies for a long time, is it true that "U.S airlines doesn't like to hire Foreign pilots because they think the pilots flew unsafely? Even with those pilots who had already have more than ten years of experiences with 747, 777 and 787?"
I want to work for the major airlines in the State, I do have other choices to fly the big jets earlier; me was thinking about getting enough experiences then will switch back to work the States, but if the rumor is true then I'd rather take step by step to built the hour and get RATP.
 

thevideographer

Well-Known Member
#3
We literally don’t care as long as you have the right to work.
In both new hire classes I've been in, 'the foreign guy' was the only one who didn't make it through training. Anecdotal, I know. It seems that they will hire them, but if they show any issues with English, or too strong an accent, or can't keep up in training then they're cut. Also anecdotally: even people with a 747 type rating can mysteriously bomb out of CRJ training.
 
#4
In both new hire classes I've been in, 'the foreign guy' was the only one who didn't make it through training. Anecdotal, I know. It seems that they will hire them, but if they show any issues with English, or too strong an accent, or can't keep up in training then they're cut. Also anecdotally: even people with a 747 type rating can mysteriously bomb out of CRJ training.
Oh so if there is any issues with english, they will just get dumped out of the company. Just wondering why the 747 captain won't get hire by the major airlines
 

Rodger Wilco

Well-Known Member
#5
Are you talking about working overseas or getting your flight training overseas?

At this point in the game I think that any amount of diversity would help your chances of getting hired more than hurt them
 

ahw01

Well-Known Member
#6
There are countless threads on other sites about whether overseas nationals can fly for the airlines in the states. There are very few legitimate schemes - Most people seem to misunderstand the visa system.

Must easier to train on EASA/equivalent in the US and then take it home. Pretty tough the other way round.

Alex.
 
#7
In both new hire classes I've been in, 'the foreign guy' was the only one who didn't make it through training. Anecdotal, I know. It seems that they will hire them, but if they show any issues with English, or too strong an accent, or can't keep up in training then they're cut. Also anecdotally: even people with a 747 type rating can mysteriously bomb out of CRJ training.
I work with a lot of foreigners at beachball. No big deal.
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
#8
Hey guys, I had some issues here. As my topic had explained some part of it, I heard some rumors from my instructors and friends who flies for a long time, is it true that "U.S airlines doesn't like to hire Foreign pilots because they think the pilots flew unsafely? Even with those pilots who had already have more than ten years of experiences with 747, 777 and 787?"
I want to work for the major airlines in the State, I do have other choices to fly the big jets earlier; me was thinking about getting enough experiences then will switch back to work the States, but if the rumor is true then I'd rather take step by step to built the hour and get RATP.
It probably depends on where in the world you are coming from also. If it's a country that has a history of good aviation training and safety, and you can get US work rights (airlines aren't getting new hires visas yet), you'll be fine. Of it's a country with a shady aviation history, you'll have a harder time.
 

NickH

Dank Meme
#9
At this point in the game I think that any amount of diversity would help your chances of getting hired more than hurt them
I'm not convinced by this. As a minority myself, I've only once experienced open discrimination, and it was negative rather than positive. (It was also in writing, clearly and unambiguously). Beyond that occurrence, I cannot say.
 
#10
In both new hire classes I've been in, 'the foreign guy' was the only one who didn't make it through training. Anecdotal, I know. It seems that they will hire them, but if they show any issues with English, or too strong an accent, or can't keep up in training then they're cut. Also anecdotally: even people with a 747 type rating can mysteriously bomb out of CRJ training.
How're guys with a 747 type. Bombing out of CRJ training?
 

Rodger Wilco

Well-Known Member
#17
I flew with a guy who had plenty of time on a 747 from overseas and he was behind the entire flight.
For one thing the CRJ200 is much more labor intensive than a lot of airlines. more than the 74 I can't say but I would assume so.
CR2 has no auto throttles, a autopilot that works mostly-ish, manual anti-ice, environmental control that needs babysitting...

Also, nobody flying a 747 is going to be up to pace of dong 6 flights a day no longer than an hour each with three aircraft swaps. Things happen somewhat rapidly when you takeoff and are cleared direct IAP, better be ready we start the approach here in 10 minutes.
 

GypsyPilot

Well-Known Member
#18
I flew with a guy who had plenty of time on a 747 from overseas and he was behind the entire flight.
For one thing the CRJ200 is much more labor intensive than a lot of airlines. more than the 74 I can't say but I would assume so.
CR2 has no auto throttles, a autopilot that works mostly-ish, manual anti-ice, environmental control that needs babysitting...

Also, nobody flying a 747 is going to be up to pace of dong 6 flights a day no longer than an hour each with three aircraft swaps. Things happen somewhat rapidly when you takeoff and are cleared direct IAP, better be ready we start the approach here in 10 minutes.
Yep. Autothrottles make you lazy VERY quickly. It’s definitely something that you have to constantly work on staying proficient with.
 
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