Flying into a hurricane!!

aceflyley

New Member
Did any of you all see the ABC news tonight? They showed some plane (I think it was operated by NOAA) fly through hurricane Isabel right into the eye of the storm. It was some pretty amazing footage, looked like an intense and pretty dang scary ride. I guess the eye of the storm is something like 100 miles wide, so they just flew around in there an did some tests. Well, stay safe all you people on the east cost, later
 

aceflyley

New Member
A C-130 is a big military plane right? I don't think it was one of those, it was much smaller. I think they said it was a P-4, or P-something.

Missed your post Wm226... Yeah, I'm pretty sure that was the one.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
I **think** it is an Orion... pretty sure it is anyway.

And Eagle.. I was just wondering the same thing. Do they try to get above the storm or fly directly through that bad boy (girl .. depending on the name)
???
 

Wm226

New Member
I found this article from NOAA's website in response to your questions:

[ QUOTE ]
I want to know how high they fly? vs how high the storm is. anyone know?

[/ QUOTE ]

For years NOAA pilots have flown P-3s into hurricanes at low altitudes (1,500-10,000 ft.) to collect research-mission data critical for computer models that predict hurricane intensity and landfall. This information is used differently than the hurricane reconnaissance information provided to the National Hurricane Center by U.S. Air Force Reserves WC-130s. Information from both types of flights, however, directly contributes to the safety of Americans living along the vulnerable Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

[ QUOTE ]
Do they try to get above the storm or fly directly through that bad boy

[/ QUOTE ]

Slicing through the eyewall of a hurricane, buffeted by howling winds, blinding rain, hail, and violent updrafts and downdrafts before entering the relative calm of the storm's eye, NOAA's two P-3 turboprop aircraft probe every wind and pressure change, repeating the grueling experience again and again during the course of a ten-hour mission.

http://www.publicaffairs.noaa.gov/grounders/hurricanehunters.html
 

av8rmsu

Well-Known Member
I saw on the news today that one of the engines flared out on it yesterday at 7,000 feet. I bet that was real fun.

If you could just hand me that red checklist over there...thanks.
 

tonyw

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
repeating the grueling experience again and again during the course of a ten-hour mission.

[/ QUOTE ]

Wow! Ten hours of doing that has got to be intense!
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
I'd probably do it ...


Somewhere in some random bar ...

Hot chick: "What do you do for a living?"
Me: "I penetrate ... hurricanes."
 

tonyw

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I'd probably do it ...


Somewhere in some random bar ...

Hot chick: "What do you do for a living?"
Me: "I penetrate ... hurricanes."


[/ QUOTE ]

Well, that's all well and good, but what if she's a Florida or FSU grad?
 

yankee_one

New Member
Hmmm... do you think on the MS FS2002 if you were to enter real world Wx that you could fly into isabel? just a thought.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
I read that they aren't even strengthened structurally; they're just the 'stock' P-3s.

How do they stay together??? Not only that, but how do they do it again and again and again and....
 

Wm226

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I read that they aren't even strengthened structurally; they're just the 'stock' P-3s.

How do they stay together??? Not only that, but how do they do it again and again and again and....

[/ QUOTE ]

It must be a very tough plane. Do you remember when the Navy EP-3 aircraft and the Chinese F-8 Fighter collided? It still amazes me that the EP-3 was able to get down safely with the skill of its flight crew; despite its damage.
 
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