Flight Education Advice

RobertM

New Member
Hi everyone,

My name’s Robert and I’m a senior in high school. I’ve wanted to be a commercial pilot for many many years now and now that I’ll be graduating soon I need to start making some firm decisions. I’ve ruled out the idea of taking the military route, simply because I don’t want to have anything to do with the military. So naturally, I have lots of questions about my “civilian” career path.

I was hoping I could get some opinions about the school I’m planning on going to after high school. Here’s a link to the site---> http://www.lanecc.edu/flight/flight.htm

And here’s a link to the college catalog for this program--> http://lanecc.edu/instadv/catalog/flight/programs/flight.htm

It’s a two-year program offered at the community college here in Eugene, Oregon. What job opportunities would there be after completing a program such as this, if any? Do you think a person who’s completed this program would stand any chance at getting a flight job with an airline? In the education page about degrees on this page, Doug said that it’s very important to get a degree. Should I get a degree in something first and then enter this program? Unfortunately, don’t think that’s an option for me. What should I do?

Basically, my main question is would it be unwise for me to go into this program right out of high school and expect to get a job flying afterwards?

Thanks for any help I can get!

-Robert
 

jtrain609

Uniting the black vote.
To sum up what you're about to hear...

-You really need a four year degree, not a two year degree.

-Get a backup degree in something other than aviation.

Others will fill in the details...


Cheers


John Herreshoff
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
Welcome to jetcareers. We have a virus going around called doughater.....so if you get a post from it, please disreguard.

You could go to Lane and, though I didn't check the link, I assume you would walk away with your CFI. With that, you are prepared to work in the industry and build your time towards an airline job. Are you qualified or could you expect to go from Lane straight to an airline? No and not even close....

If you want to work at the best jobs in aviation, you'll need a four year degree. Doesn't have to be in aviation, though, and you might be able to transfer a lot of your Lane credits to another University.

Do you have other interests outside of aviation that you could pursue a degree in? If you did, you could work on that while going to a local flight school for your ratings. No one cares where you fly at...it's all about ratings, hours, and experience.

By all means, you should pursue flying right out of high school.
 

Phoenix_Son

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
No one cares where you fly at...

[/ QUOTE ]
By "no one," you mean prospective employers won't ask (or care) where he got his ratings and education, just as long as he has them and has the minimum hours of flight time - right?
Just clarifying...
 

RobertM

New Member
I had planned on getting a degree in computer science if a pilot career wasn't possible. If I were to truly pursue being a pilot, I would want to get a degree in something at least semi-related to the field.

Do you think it would it be possible to get a job as a flight instructor after completing such a program, and having no four-year degree? It would be nice if I didn't have to work at a grocery store for 4 years while I pay off a degree.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
I'm sure you could get a CFI job after going through the Lane program if you got your CFI as part of it. But you could get your CFI by going to any average flight school that offers that training. If being a CFI is your goal, why get a useless two year degree....unless you would turn that into a four year degree.
 

RobertM

New Member
I can feel the stupidity radiating of this question but couldn't I just get a job as a CFI and at least start making some money doing something I'd enjoy and then, while doing this part-time, get a degree in something (aviation, for example) After getting flight hours as a CFI, would I be able to get a job with an airline or even doing corporate flying? Honestly, I'd love to be a commercial pilot, but I could settle for less and still be happy flying.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
There are no stupid qestions at jetcareers. I think it would be very reasonable to get your CFI and then work on a degree....non-aviation is best. Or you could start your degree while working your way up with the ratings. The Lane program would be fine if it includes a CFI and you can transfer to a four year degree.

Moving up the career ladder from CFI takes time, experience, hours, and networking. It also takes a four year degree if you want a shot at the top. Your choice.
 

Raskolnikov

Well-Known Member
Hey welcome to JC. I'll start by saying I have exactly zero hours of flight time. So I don't have a golden egg for you, sorry. Take my advice with a grain of salt.

I went to Cottage Grove H.S. just down the road from Lane. Went to the University of Washington, got a degree, saving money to fly. My advice: You are in a great place to learn to fly as far as saving money goes. Don't limit yourself to the Lane program. Check out some of the other FBOs in the area. I know Creswell has really cheap rates and because you're in Oregon you'll pay nothing in sales tax. It might be a good idea to get all your ratings, through CFI, there in cheap ol' Oregon. Then you could work part time as a CFI while you work on a four year degree. By the time you graduate you might have enough hours under your belt to sell yourself to a regional airline. That's what I would do If I could go back and do it all over again.

Good luck!!!!
 

737_ATP

New Member
Quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I’ve ruled out the idea of taking the military route, simply because I don’t want to have anything to do with the military.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



You sure ruled out any proud veterans from helping you out.
 

RobertM

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Hey welcome to JC. I'll start by saying I have exactly zero hours of flight time. So I don't have a golden egg for you, sorry. Take my advice with a grain of salt.

I went to Cottage Grove H.S. just down the road from Lane. Went to the University of Washington, got a degree, saving money to fly. My advice: You are in a great place to learn to fly as far as saving money goes. Don't limit yourself to the Lane program. Check out some of the other FBOs in the area. I know Creswell has really cheap rates and because you're in Oregon you'll pay nothing in sales tax. It might be a good idea to get all your ratings, through CFI, there in cheap ol' Oregon. Then you could work part time as a CFI while you work on a four year degree. By the time you graduate you might have enough hours under your belt to sell yourself to a regional airline. That's what I would do If I could go back and do it all over again.

Good luck!!!!

[/ QUOTE ]First off, thanks for the advice. What you're suggesting sounds great. I do have a couple questions though...

Yet again, I know this is a stupid question, but what's an FBO? Flight school?

Second of all, if I went to a flight school in Creswell for example, and began training to become a CFI, how much would it cost me before I got it, and about how long would it take? The program at Lane costs a hefty $31k for two years. Is this a total rip-off and could I get my CFI cheaper?
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
what's an FBO?

[/ QUOTE ]
= Fixed Base Operator.

Or - "small airport" in laymans terms.
Some FBO's have flight schools under Part 61 and Part 141 and some FBO's have no flight instruction. Depends on the operator.

I had the same question when I started. I heard the term and went ?????.


Welcome to the site!

Ask away. We'll be glad to help where we can..... and oh yeah.. how are your reflexes? Remember to duck.


Kidding.


Best of luck!

R2F
 

jtrain609

Uniting the black vote.
BTW Robert, just to let you know, I'm a junior in college right now and I'm studying political science and philosophy. I'm certinally going to be as marketable to an airline as anyone with an aviation degree if I have the hours put in. I would listen to these guys and study something other than aviation.

Cheers


John Herreshoff
 

Raskolnikov

Well-Known Member
An FBO is a Fixed Base Operator. They are the general aviation airports where you can rent airplanes, buy fuel, learn to fly, etc. Someone on here could probably supply a more exact definition. I checked the rates at Creswell this summer. A Cessna 152 was going for $48/hour, instruction was about $30/hour. You need 250 hours to get your commercial rating and you won't need the instructor for all 250 so you could estimate $65/hour. $65 x 250hours = $16,250. You would also need to add the cost of getting your CFI ratings. Multi engine time is also important though, so you should look into how many multi hours the Lane program includes. If the Lane program can take you through your CFI multi engine, $31,000 doesn't sound all that "hefty." One advantage to Lane would be that you could work on an AA while you're there, then transfer to the UO.

I would suggest going to Creswell and some of the other airports (FBOs) in the area and compare prices and facilities. Take an intro flight at some of the places so you can compare a few instructors too. Also look into the Lane program. You are going to make quite an investment. It's important that you're comfortable with the place where you'll be spending your money. Shop around.

Jet Careers is a HUGE resource. Use the search feature to see what other people have asked and gotten advice on.

Good luck.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
I would disagree that you can do all 250 hours in a 152. You need 10 hours in a complex for your commercial and some of your CFI should be done in a complex. A complex plane is used for more advanced training and not all schools will even have one....plus they will probably be at least $100 per hour to rent. If the 152's are well equipped, you could do you IFR in one, but it's common to use a larger plane. At the same time, I have a very well equipped 152 that I plan to use for IFR, so it can be done. Does the Lane program include your multi ratings? Again, twin engine planes are very expensive and many schools will not operate one.

You could do some of your training at Creswell and then go other places for the more advanced ratings. I think you could do it for less than the Lane program but, at the same time, I don't think 31K for all your training up through multi-CFI is a bad deal.

You have to be very careful to get good training for advanced ratings at mom and pop flight schools. The can be okay for private and instrument but when it comes to the CFI ratings, you really should go to a school where they crank out a lot of those types of pilots. For example, though I'm legal to do it, I don't train CFI's because of the intensity of the ground instruction and just flat out because I don't feel I would serve the student well. On the other hand, I don't mind doing privates and consider myself a very good instrument instructor.

Like I said before, too, I wouldn't bother with a two year degree unless you plan on transfering somewhere else for a four year.
 
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