Failed checkrides

GypsyPilot

Well-Known Member
Managing glass cockpits isn't too hard, at least if you grew up with computers and are in your 20s or 30s. ;)
It’s not managing the glass that some people have difficulty with. I’d really say that falls under flying the airplane.

It’s managing the airplane. The flight crew, pax, ATC, company, etc. If you attempt a one man show with this, or just aren’t good at delegating and listening, you’re going to have a bad time.
 

Autothrust Blue

"...I know bait when I see it..."
It’s not managing the glass that some people have difficulty with. I’d really say that falls under flying the airplane.

It’s managing the airplane. The flight crew, pax, ATC, company, etc. If you attempt a one man show with this, or just aren’t good at delegating and listening, you’re going to have a bad time.
Sure.

But if you can’t fly the bloody airplane, you’re reaaaaaalllyyyy going to have a bad time.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Can you elaborate more on this “Year of terror”? I never knew about that.
When the Federales required copilots receive type ratings, there’s a couple regionals where some instructors would hand out failures like wet naps at B-Dubbs. Instead of having the cajones to brief a minor deviance, they basically failed applicants for idiotic reasons.
 

Nark

Sheepdog
We are talking about real airplanes...Le'Bus is does not qualify as that. Q400 is, by far, in the Top 3 "Toughest Transport Category" to fly. (@mikecweb
's MD-11 takes the cake, it'll kill ya).
Any transport pilot that fancies themselves as a "real airplane" pilot is delusional...

I love le'Bus, because I don't have to work hard, at work... American Dream my friend!
 

Autothrust Blue

"...I know bait when I see it..."
When the Federales required copilots receive type ratings, there’s a couple regionals where some instructors would hand out failures like wet naps at B-Dubbs. Instead of having the cajones to brief a minor deviance, they basically failed applicants for idiotic reasons.
That has gone 100% the opposite direction, or at least it was at $EMPLOYER_PREVIOUS.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
When the Federales required copilots receive type ratings, there’s a couple regionals where some instructors would hand out failures like wet naps at B-Dubbs. Instead of having the cajones to brief a minor deviance, they basically failed applicants for idiotic reasons.
I mean, you suddenly give a bunch of a dudes examining authority and (presumably) hammer into them the difference between an FAA type ride and a normal 121 ride and I’m not sure what else you’d expect to have happen.
 

nuneze23

Well-Known Member
3 checkride failures, twice the instrument oral (face palm), once the instrument “sim” portion of the checkride. Back when Riddle Diddle still had a Part 142 certification. I owned up to all of them and found the silver lining..... for interviewing purposes it’s what they want to hear. However, I think I fell victim to some of the Riddle Skygod complex Checkairmen we had at the time. Zero 121 busts and now at one of the big 3. Hope that helps.
 

TallWeeds

Well-Known Member
I have three primary training busts and am at one of the big 3. Was asked specifics on each one in the interview. Those coupled with some previous flying caused one interviewer to look me square in the eyes and say, "We don't get a lot of your type in here."
 

JDean3204

Well-Known Member
Props are for boats. We were talking about real airplanes :p
The Q is about 50 times harder to “manage” than the ejet was. I felt more comfortable after 100 hours in the jet than I did with 500 in the Q. The training in the jet was easier too, V1 cuts were an absolute joke. A V1 cut in the Q gets hairy quick if you’re not on it. Just sayin :)
 

SurferLucas

Southern Gentleman
The Q is about 50 times harder to “manage” than the ejet was. I felt more comfortable after 100 hours in the jet than I did with 500 in the Q. The training in the jet was easier too, V1 cuts were an absolute joke. A V1 cut in the Q gets hairy quick if you’re not on it. Just sayin :)
#V2cuts...that’s where the men get separated from the boys
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
The Q is about 50 times harder to “manage” than the ejet was. I felt more comfortable after 100 hours in the jet than I did with 500 in the Q. The training in the jet was easier too, V1 cuts were an absolute joke. A V1 cut in the Q gets hairy quick if you’re not on it. Just sayin :)

I hear ya, but then I think one guy without any pilot license or training took a Q, started engines, taxied out, took off, maneuvered all around, fully looped it successfully........ and it’s like man either this thing isn’t too hard to fly or Microsoft Flight Sim really is “as real as it gets.”
 
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