FAA type rating oral exam prep

J777Fly

Well-Known Member
I need some ideas on how to prepare for a FAA type rating oral exam at a flight school.

How much detail are you expected to know, considering the variables of these complicated systems (referencing the 737 in this instance)

Also do they ask questions using a cockpit diagram or just fire questions at you from a book/memory.
 

rausda27

Well-Known Member
Limitations and Immediate action items from checklists are a given. Systems knowledge depends on the examiner, but typically they use the cockpit diagram and check functional knowledge of each system. By the end of training, it's typically a non-event. I wouldn't sweat it, your instructor(s) should be able to provide you with specific information once you start. One thing to remember, if you get asked a question and you don't know the answer, do not make something up. Simply state you aren't sure, but you know where to find the information. It's a lot of information in a short period of time to absorb, so it's understandable that you may not remember every detail presented in ground school. Just don't use that strategy for every question. I think examiners are finally getting away from re-engineering the airplane and focusing more on functional knowledge.
 

Autothrust Blue

"I'll take your case."
An old timer once told me that if you know what each switch does and what each light means (what makes it go on and off), you're good to go.

Oh yea, and limitations.
Limitations and memory items, 100%, verbatim. Sets the tone for the rest of the event.

Know what all the little frobs and buttons do.

Know how to do whatever performance tasks they give.

Smile, shake hands, shoot breeze.
 

Crop Duster

E pluribus unum
If you've got your limitations, emergency items, and annunciators down cold, and a 15-20000ft understanding of all the systems, you should be fine.
 

Crop Duster

E pluribus unum
Know the Annunciator panel. I had an examinator go through it. "When this light goes off what does it mean, what do you do"? etc.
If we could only seat a passenger in view of the annunciator panel... Nobody notices red lights on a panel quicker than a Pax. :)
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
If we could only seat a passenger in view of the annunciator panel... Nobody notices red lights on a panel quicker than a Pax. :)
We used to say the FE panel had a vacuum effect...the closer you sat, the more it sucked your brains out.
 

Acrofox

All fox
Limitations and memory items, 100%, verbatim. Sets the tone for the rest of the event.

Know what all the little frobs and buttons do.

Know how to do whatever performance tasks they give.

Smile, shake hands, shoot breeze.
... Most of the time.

My first type ride was a bit more "intense" than normal, from what I've subsequently learned.

-Fox
 

Autothrust Blue

"I'll take your case."
... Most of the time.

My first type ride was a bit more "intense" than normal, from what I've subsequently learned.

-Fox
Your program needed to get its act together (and do some more than the bare minimum knowledge infusion...or at least get to the bare minimum knowledge infusion). Wasn’t personal, you just happened to snag the short straw.
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
Limitations & memory items is always the warm up, then into systems. Probably going to get asked about shedding loads during a bus or generator failure, but you're not going to be asked how long the MEL for an inop taxi light is good for.
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
  • Know the Annunciator panel. I had an examinator go through it. "When this light goes off what does it mean, what do you do"? etc.
  • V-Speeds
  • Limitations
  • Memory Items
  • Systems
And with respect to the annunciator panels, if you go a layer deeper learning helps learn the systems.

What's the red low oil pressure light mean? The first layer is to say, "uhhh low oil pressure duh, follow the qrh," a deeper understanding is, "it means that the pressure at the oil pressure sensor (which is just downstream of the primary pressure pump) sensed less than 40psi, I should pull out the qrh." Learning it like this helps me learn the systems too.
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
Limitations & memory items is always the warm up, then into systems. Probably going to get asked about shedding loads during a bus or generator failure, but you're not going to be asked how long the MEL for an inop taxi light is good for.
Honestly I've been asked about the MEL and when I give checkrides I ask questions like that. Of course the applicant can totally look it up, but then I just learned that they can use the MEL and know how it works.

That's a lot more important to your job than knowing the voltage that causes the left Gen Bus to auto-loadshed or whatever.
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
Good to know. I was asked about MELs during my commercial and ATP rides, but it was more inline with knowing that it exists and how it applies rather than a specific item in it.

The examiners couldn’t have asked about a specific item since an MEL didn’t exist for the aircraft that I did those rides in.
 

Oxman

Well-Known Member
Honestly I've been asked about the MEL and when I give checkrides I ask questions like that. Of course the applicant can totally look it up, but then I just learned that they can use the MEL and know how it works.

That's a lot more important to your job than knowing the voltage that causes the left Gen Bus to auto-loadshed or whatever.
During my ME Pvt oral the examiner asked "which is the critical engine?" I jokingly answered "To me, the one that is still working". He thought that was hysterical.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
At the regional, I once had an examiner for a PC ask me questions “backwards.”

Like he’d say “230”

What’s that number mean for limitations?

“In icing conditions, ice light, below this speed, wing A/I on.”

“anything else?”


Then you’re second guessing stuff. Thinking, was the wiper speed 230 or 220 kts?

“Um, the manufacturer limit for flaps 8 is 230, but company we do 200.”



I think that’s a crappy way of examining about things.
 
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