FAA medical/company physical questions

Ophir

Well-Known Member
So I was reading in a “Flight Physiology” book about the medical. One of the things that they described was that you will eventually need to have a complete family history; you will be expected to provide causes of death and illnesses in your family members past. So I am adopted and I have no idea. Have any of you guys who have been through the whole thing ever needed to provide such info? Do you think this is something that I should have researched to be prepared?

What are some of the bizarre stories you have heard about with pilots being grounded for medicals? How did they get out of it?

Is it true that there are flight surgeons out there that will approve anyone? Is it true that pilots have an underground network of physicians that they go to when they are in need of a test that they don’t necessarily want the FAA to know about?
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
My first medical was denied for 5 months. Know what I did? I checked the "Asthma/Allergy" box. That was an automatic denial at the time. I do have asthma, but I also have food allergy's so I'd have to check the box no matter what. That doc said that was the FAA's policy. That was for a 3rd class medical. A few years later I go in for my 1st class and the doc (who is an asthma doc) says he's never denied anyone just because they had asthma.

If you have a condition like asthma, find an AME that specializes in it because most people don't understand the condition.

That's my medical story.

Cheers


John Herreshoff
 

farwellbooth

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
you will eventually need to have a complete family history; you will be expected to provide causes of death and illnesses in your family members past.

[/ QUOTE ]
Do airlines do this now?
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
I think I had to answer those questions during my Delta interview.

Holy crap, they took enough blood out of my arm (genetic testing?) to give a man a transfusion!

Hmm... Perhaps... Nah!
 

Cheechako

Well-Known Member
Learn and memorize these words:

PREVIOUSLY REPORTED, NO CHANGE



EVERY medical I get I have to write that line!
 

davetheflyer

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Holy crap, they took enough blood out of my arm (genetic testing?) to give a man a transfusion!



[/ QUOTE ]

Hmm. Maybe they are going to create an army of clones to fly their airplanes for free.
 

IrishSheepdog

Sitting in the median
I am also adopted. So I don't know my family's medical history. However, my medical history up to now has been good. So when they ask about my medical history, I say it is good.

I'm sure if a company denied you because of a lack of a family medical history (for those who don't know it) they would be breaking some sort of law. Any thoughts?
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Well, of course they'd never notify you why you weren't hired to avoid liability.

Hint: If you don't know (wink wink), you don't know.
 

aviator

New Member
I have heard that most pilots answers these types of questions the way Doug implied. Even if every person in your family died of congestive heart failure, are YOU sure they didn't die of old age? Are YOU a doctor? Did YOU personally perform an autopsy on Uncle Petey (may he rest in peace)? Maybe everyone in your family is very secretive and medical issues are not discussed.......ect
 

Fearless

Dash Dominatrix
During the time I was interviewing for a job with a regional airline, I was NEVER asked anything about my family medical history. A couple of the interviewers asked me about my general health, which I could truthfully answer as "good".

My current employer requires you to have a first-class medical at the time you are hired. You may allow this to lapse to a second class during the time you fly as SIC (second-in-command). Only the captain is required to have a first-class medical.

The company I work for also doesn't care if you have limitations on your medical certificate or even waivers, as long as they don't interfere with your ability to do the job. For example, my medical bears the limitation "holder shall wear corrective lenses". At one time, I had waivers on both my second- and first-class medical (for uncorrected visual accuity - no longer required). There's even a few pilots here who have special issuance medicals.

Of the regional airlines, American Eagle seems to have the most extensive medical requirements. A few companies also have a "no nicotine" policy, possibly because smokers, as a group, tend to have higher medical insurance costs.

FFFI
 
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