FAA IOE Requirement

bafanguy

Well-Known Member
These days in FAA land, people get the prescribed number of IOE hours with a check airman immediately post-type rating. Was that always the case or was there a time when such a requirement didn't exist ? And if it didn't always exist, when did the regs change to require it ?

I'm very peripherally involved in an airline history project where the early days of the airline are being reconstructed in detail. But I can't remember what line training requirements we had immediately post-type rating. My first reaction was that we got the 25 hours (or so) IOE time with a check airman as we do today but can't really remember doing that so now question whether we did anything like today's IOE.

Anyone know if IOE existed in the regs before (or in) about 1971 ? Specific FAR references would be appreciated.

MidlifeFlyer ?
 
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bafanguy

Well-Known Member
MidlifeFlyer,

Thanks. That would seem to indicate some form of IOE was in place in 1971. No surprise my memory of events 45+years ago just might be lacking.
 

Crop Duster

E pluribus unum
How did we live before federalregister.gov, anyway?
There were these odd institutions called Libraries in which worked highly qualified curators who managed large volumes of information, both locally and across a word-wide network of other libraries. These folks were highly trained and typically took their work extremely seriously. They knew just where to look to provide patrons with the information they sought. They even vetted the information to make sure they weren't providing BS to an unwitting public who, by and large, would otherwise have no way of knowing which sources were legit and which were too legit to quit. The bigger libraries and university libraries even had call in lines called "Ready Reference" which folks could call to receive almost instantaneous answers to specific questions like, for instance, "where can I find the language of the The 1971 Final Rule?" Society chose to fund these bastions of truth, beauty, creativity, intelligence, and valid information because society used to appreciate such things. Oh, the halcyon days.
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
There were these odd institutions called Libraries in which worked highly qualified curators who managed large volumes of information, both locally and across a word-wide network of other libraries. These folks were highly trained and typically took their work extremely seriously. They knew just where to look to provide patrons with the information they sought. They even vetted the information to make sure they weren't providing BS to an unwitting public who, by and large, would otherwise have no way of knowing which sources were legit and which were too legit to quit. The bigger libraries and university libraries even had call in lines called "Ready Reference" which folks could call to receive almost instantaneous answers to specific questions like, for instance, "where can I find the language of the The 1971 Final Rule?" Society chose to fund these bastions of truth, beauty, creativity, intelligence, and valid information because society used to appreciate such things. Oh, the halcyon days.
Remember microfiche?
 
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