F-18 AND C-130 down off Japan

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#43
GIB's (Enlisted SENSO and NFO TACCO) out first in command ejection mode in the S-3.
I might be thinking of another aircraft then. B-66 or something.

I just remember in that era of enlisted GIBs with Officers in front like a stationwagon there was one plane whose designer seemed to go with a peculiar setup of holding the aft ejection sequence that way if the roof panel blew but the seat didn’t fire the crew member wasn’t then cooked by a seat forward of them ejecting....you know because if your seat doesn’t get out the fire from another ejection seat is of real concern....
 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
#44
I might be thinking of another aircraft then. B-66 or something.

I just remember in that era of enlisted GIBs with Officers in front like a stationwagon there was one plane whose designer seemed to go with a peculiar setup of holding the aft ejection sequence that way if the roof panel blew but the seat didn’t fire the crew member wasn’t then cooked by a seat forward of them ejecting....you know because if your seat doesn’t get out the fire from another ejection seat is of real concern....
RB-66 had four ECM officers in the bomb bay with downward firing seats - pretty sketchy.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#45
RB-66 had four ECM officers in the bomb bay with downward firing seats - pretty sketchy.
If we’re being honest with ourselves ejection seats on a whole are pretty much the “we gotta give them something....” answer to an incredibly difficult engineering problem.

It would be awesome if they like so many things worked like they do in the movies.
 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
#46
If we’re being honest with ourselves ejection seats on a whole are pretty much the “we gotta give them something....” answer to an incredibly difficult engineering problem.

It would be awesome if they like so many things worked like they do in the movies.
My father did three Vietnam cruises in A-3's and has a tally sheet in his logbook how many times he would have punched out if he had the option.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
#47
My father did three Vietnam cruises in A-3's and has a tally sheet in his logbook how many times he would have punched out if he had the option.
Did USN A-1 Skyraiders have any kind of ejection system? I know when the USAF acquired the ex-USN planes, they installed an extraction system, from a fixed seat.
 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
#48
Did USN A-1 Skyraiders have any kind of ejection system? I know when the USAF acquired the ex-USN planes, they installed an extraction system, from a fixed seat.
I don't believe any Navy model had an extraction system, certainly not in the Vietnam era. My father crewed in EA-1F's before transitioning to EKA-3B's.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#50
I assume the nickname "All Three Dead" for A3D came for a reason.
Apparently the Navy opted to not put ejection seats in to save weight.

One has to wonder what the cost/benefit analysis that went into that decision looked like.


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#51
I should have known better, being 1st and 3rd MAW over my 5 years as a jarhead.

I was 171, then 372. Still wear 3rd MAW patch despite being part of the 77th (29th?!?!) and 16th CAB.
212 used to be the -18 squadron when I was with 171 in Iwakuni.
That squadron is now my Battalion’s callsign. Funny how these things work.
 
#52
The deceased rhino pilot is Capt Jahmar Resilard. Sounds like he might have ejected and something happened on the way down or when he landed as he was found deceased.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#56
That explains it. Story said he was VMFA(AW), so D models. The WSO was the first survivor then.

Curiously, are they going G models to replace the EA-6Bs?
Last conversation I had with my buddies wife (ECMO) the plan is to start crew augmenting Navy squadrons the same way the Air Force did with Raven guys Post 111 retirement so as to keep the career field and knowledge base alive.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#59
Ahh, I didn't realize the USMC didn't have any E/Fs. Most of those C/Ds are as old as the guys flying them.
It gets weirder....

A few years back due to the disparity in deployments to ship the Navy’s newer C models were ragged out.... so they cherry picked the Marines low trap count aircraft and in “trade” gave them newer lot C models. They also funded the Marines taking old A/B models to build to C/D standard.

The Marines brought it on themselves though. In 97 they were all in to take the E/F model but the writing on the wall was if JSF ran into real trouble the first thing to go would be the B model slated to replace the Harrier. The Marines basically went Mexican stand off with that idea by going “all in” on the 35B and refusing the E/F (a few more times when offered) because they didn’t want to find themselves with less Hornets that the Navy saw as an augmenting fleet to use for carrier cruises and no replacement for the Harrier. Probably was in many ways the right decision for the Marines in the long run.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
#60
Last conversation I had with my buddies wife (ECMO) the plan is to start crew augmenting Navy squadrons the same way the Air Force did with Raven guys Post 111 retirement so as to keep the career field and knowledge base alive.
Buddy of mine in my old A-10 squadron long ago got his next assignment to EA-6Bs up at Whidbey in the (then) 4 expeditionary VMAQs they had. 2000ish. He was one of the last USAF guys to get carrier qualed (day only) before the expeditionary squadrons were no longer going to have to be boat qualed.

Speaking of C models, I had heard that the 4 or so USMC C model Hornet boat squadrons, were no longer going to be doing boat deployments to the Air Wings anymore.
 
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