F-18 AND C-130 down off Japan

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
#1
So breaking it’s not on the internet yet but CNN just broke in to report a C-130 with believed 5 on board and F-18 with 2 on board are down off Japan. Unknown status of those on board.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
#5
Happens, unfortunately. Air-air refueling occurrences happen more than people know and many go unreported in any news outlets, both in boom A/R as well as probe & drogue A/R. Boom collisions, damaged booms and aircraft, torn off drogues, etc. All kinds of nastiness can occur, and that's just in daytime clear weather A/R. Add in night, and/or foul weather, and the risks just get higher. Having done both boom as well as probe/drogue A/R, I've seen the risks that each type has inherent to its operation.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
#8
Talking to a soar buddy, I no longer have any desire to be dragged behind a herc.
@Lawman, you an expert at it yet?
One is never an expert at it. Far too much that is out of your own control, even though you're the one doing all the work in probe/drogue.

Boom is little different, but has its own challenges.
 

Flyinthrew

Well-Known Member
#9
I've been dragged behind tankers (especially herks) for a significant portion of my life. J models are great. The highest risk segment of the evolution is the join. The fighter lead doing a SH turning join and slicking off his low SA wingman into the tanker is a way bigger threat than having such a huge abortion at the basket that you bring the damn tanker down with you.

As for this, I'm not speculating on the internet. It could be literally anything from failure of little airplane big sky deconfliction to screwing the join to gooning up vectors in the terminal area while listening to Japanese controllers. Just waiting to see who it is, and whether I have another memorial/funeral to attend.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
#13
I've been dragged behind tankers (especially herks) for a significant portion of my life. J models are great. The highest risk segment of the evolution is the join. The fighter lead doing a SH turning join and slicking off his low SA wingman into the tanker is a way bigger threat than having such a huge abortion at the basket that you bring the damn tanker down with you.

As for this, I'm not speculating on the internet. It could be literally anything from failure of little airplane big sky deconfliction to screwing the join to gooning up vectors in the terminal area while listening to Japanese controllers. Just waiting to see who it is, and whether I have another memorial/funeral to attend.
In helos, the at-basket time could get dicey, just with how close everything is.......rotors to drogue, rotors to C-130, etc. The tanker generally did the rejoin. Whereas in boom A/R, fighter rejoin was most common.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#14
Talking to a soar buddy, I no longer have any desire to be dragged behind a herc.
@Lawman, you an expert at it yet?
Still waiting in my turn, but the systems provided by the digital FCS and coupled control modes make it far far safer than what dudes were doing just a decade ago.

The areas where “stuff happens” are still there, but the transitions between them get far simpler and provide more control to the steps of the process.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#15
Neither do 135 crews for comparison. They stopped flying with chutes a couple decades ago because it was determined after a couple events the escape hatch survival rate out of a 707 series plane was more dangerous than riding the thing into the crash.

In helos, the at-basket time could get dicey, just with how close everything is.......rotors to drogue, rotors to C-130, etc. The tanker generally did the rejoin. Whereas in boom A/R, fighter rejoin was most common.
Similar TTP. With everybody able to fix each other’s position it makes far more sense for the faster aircraft to come to the slower one and just get on altitude once there.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
#18
Neither do 135 crews for comparison. They stopped flying with chutes a couple decades ago because it was determined after a couple events the escape hatch survival rate out of a 707 series plane was more dangerous than riding the thing into the crash.



Similar TTP. With everybody able to fix each other’s position it makes far more sense for the faster aircraft to come to the slower one and just get on altitude once there.
At least we never did what the Brits did with the Vulcan where the officers had ejection seats and the enlisted had seat belts.
 
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