Extremely Mild Autism

WhereThere'sAWill

Active Member
Hi, I'm considering entering my college's aviation program and I was wondering how reasonable it would be to expect to get a first class medical. I was diagnosed with autism many years ago. I am aware of at least one case where someone on the spectrum was granted a second class airman medical certificate (see link below).

http://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/designees_delegations/designee_types/ame/fasmb/media/autism.pdf

I don't know all the facts about his condition, but I'd say my autism is similarly mild if not actually milder! I lack many of the classic symptoms of autism. I have no sensory sensitivity issues. I enjoy meeting new people, socializing with friends, and talking with others. I am also quite emotionally stable and not prone to emotional outbursts.

I am intellectually and academically gifted, maintaining a 4.0 college GPA. I drive my own car too and recently drove over 2,500 miles round trip on spring break by myself. I have never taken any medications and am self-independent.

Basically, I'm one of the most neurotypical people on the spectrum you'll ever come across, however paradoxical that may sound. Many people would never suspect me to be autistic. I've actually wondered if I couldn't get my diagnosis removed, or at least reclassified by a psychological professional. My symptoms may have been more pronounced at one time, but I seem to have largely outgrown them.

Considering the unique circumstances I present, what is your professional opinion regarding my eligibility for a first class medical? I'm confident I have the capabilities to learn to fly and safely operate a large airliner, but would deeply appreciate an answer straight from the horse's mouth. lol See, I understand idioms too. Seriously though, what do you think?
 

Seggy

Well-Known Member
Hi, I'm considering entering my college's aviation program and I was wondering how reasonable it would be to expect to get a first class medical. I was diagnosed with autism many years ago. I am aware of at least one case where someone on the spectrum was granted a second class airman medical certificate (see link below).

http://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/designees_delegations/designee_types/ame/fasmb/media/autism.pdf

I don't know all the facts about his condition, but I'd say my autism is similarly mild if not actually milder! I lack many of the classic symptoms of autism. I have no sensory sensitivity issues. I enjoy meeting new people, socializing with friends, and talking with others. I am also quite emotionally stable and not prone to emotional outbursts.

I am intellectually and academically gifted, maintaining a 4.0 college GPA. I drive my own car too and recently drove over 2,500 miles round trip on spring break by myself. I have never taken any medications and am self-independent.

Basically, I'm one of the most neurotypical people on the spectrum you'll ever come across, however paradoxical that may sound. Many people would never suspect me to be autistic. I've actually wondered if I couldn't get my diagnosis removed, or at least reclassified by a psychological professional. My symptoms may have been more pronounced at one time, but I seem to have largely outgrown them.

Considering the unique circumstances I present, what is your professional opinion regarding my eligibility for a first class medical? I'm confident I have the capabilities to learn to fly and safely operate a large airliner, but would deeply appreciate an answer straight from the horse's mouth. lol See, I understand idioms too. Seriously though, what do you think?
I would call these folks...

https://www.aviationmedicine.com/

Look under 'individual assistance'.

It will cost a little, but they will be able to help guide you through the processes to see if it can be done.

Good luck!
 
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ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
Sounds like you were overdiagnosed by people who didn't understand normal childhood behavior.
This stuff drives me nuts. If you really want to get your blood pressure spiking, check out "Oppositional Defiant Disorder." Apparently that's one of the new alphabet soup of disorders that our children keep getting because we don't care enough to find real solutions to problems.
 
This stuff drives me nuts. If you really want to get your blood pressure spiking, check out "Oppositional Defiant Disorder." Apparently that's one of the new alphabet soup of disorders that our children keep getting because we don't care enough to find real solutions to problems.
Umm... wrong. So wrong. O.D.D. is a real disorder in children and typically a precursor, for psychopathy/sociopathy personality disorder diagnosis as an adult.

Ask me how I know. . .
 
This stuff drives me nuts. If you really want to get your blood pressure spiking, check out "Oppositional Defiant Disorder." Apparently that's one of the new alphabet soup of disorders that our children keep getting because we don't care enough to find real solutions to problems.
Lastly. O.D.D like Conduct Disorder are purely behavioral disorders, and not chemical in nature. Behavioral related mental illness all stems from some manner of extreme trauma, neglect or abuse. Or their could be a genetic component. There is no fix for behavioral related disorders. No magic pills, only intense psychotherapy, for teaching coping skills. One would probably see a child psychologist for O.D.D. or Conduct disorder related issues. Over say a psychiatrist, in order to find the root cause of these maladaptive behavioral outburst. Psychiatrist are medical doctors first and foremost, so their first answer to everything is typically to prescribe something. They typically work better with chemical related mental illness, that meds can affect. The likes of bipolar, psychosis, schizophrenia and anxiety related disorders.

In the case of O.D.D and CD, a psychiatrist could prescribe something the likes of Ativan, Xanax, Trazodone and maybe Seroquel. Ativan and Xanax are basically just chill out pills to help calm you down, make you mellow. Trazodone and Seroquel are anti-psychotics which as a secondary function make you drowsy. Because the thought here is that you can't be wigging out, if you're passed out. It's kind of like kicking the can down the road so to speak.

Again none of these medication methods actually treat the symptoms, they are only a temporary fix to placate the negative behavior. Only psychotherapy can help, by teaching one about their illness, and offering positive coping skills for their behavior. And honestly even that isn't assured.
 
But it does work sometimes. I know of one such case.
Oh yes, you're right. But it's not as assured as say biochemical mental illness. Every 7-10 days with a round of anti-psychotics, I see modern day miracles from the bipolar, or schizophrenic patients at work. From presenting with catatonia, paranoia psychosis. To being fully aware and alert, regular thinking people at time of discharge. It's nothing short of amazing.
 

WhereThere'sAWill

Active Member
I would call these folks...

https://www.aviationmedicine.com/

Look under 'individual assistance'.

It will cost a little, but they will be able to help guide you through the processes to see if it can be done.

Good luck!
Thanks for the advice. I may use the service provided on the aviation medicine website. Noticed that Dr. Forred is apparently not active on here any longer. How unfortunate that is.

Sorry, nothing to add, but your post makes me wonder how you even got diagnosed in the first place??
Well, way back when I was a little kiddie, I wasn't really meeting my developmental milestones like I was supposed to, so my parents dragged me to the "experts", some of whom suggested some rather ridiculous things. Some of them claimed I was dangerous to my brothers, even though there was nothing substantial to support that. Some even went so far as to suggest I be placed in an institution. Can you imagine? They gave my parents the rather grim prediction that I would "never be normal". Being who I am now, it all seems patently ridiculous. Their advice was more dangerous than anything else.

Anyways, I'm certainly not the first case of a slow grower who eventually turned out to be okay as an adult. Just philosophizing a little here, but maybe it just proves we need to have some faith in our kids, because if we don't, who will? These professionals, even though they had these fancy titles and pieces of paper to their name, didn't really know me like my parents did. My parents realized this and I'm in a good place now, because we disregarded the misguided advice of these so-called experts. My parents really were my best advocates. Even the school system mostly didn't seem very willing to work with me or look at me as someone with potential, so I was homeschooled for many years, but resumed traditional schooling at 8th grade.

Anyways, I feel pretty confident a first class is within reach. If anyone is curious, I may be able to update you all here on how things go for me.
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
This stuff drives me nuts. If you really want to get your blood pressure spiking, check out "Oppositional Defiant Disorder." Apparently that's one of the new alphabet soup of disorders that our children keep getting because we don't care enough to find real solutions to problems.
Yeah, agreed - I've been reading up a lot lately on the male failure to launch phenomena, including the over diagnosing of boys with disorders, when reality you can't expect a seven year old to sit in a seat for 7 straight hours.

Personally, I'd meet with other behavioral psychiatrists and see what they think. Unrelated to your situation (since I don't know it) but I wouldn't be surprised if 10 years from now we find that over half of autism diagnoses were really nothing at all.
 
Yeah, agreed - I've been reading up a lot lately on the male failure to launch phenomena, including the over diagnosing of boys with disorders, when reality you can't expect a seven year old to sit in a seat for 7 straight hours.

Personally, I'd meet with other behavioral psychiatrists and see what they think. Unrelated to your situation (since I don't know it) but I wouldn't be surprised if 10 years from now we find that over half of autism diagnoses were really nothing at all.
:rolleyes:
 

kryan11

Well-Known Member
My question is, and this might not be looked well upon, could you get away with not disclosing it to your AME?
 

kryan11

Well-Known Member
Do not under ANY circumstances do this.

You need to disclose your medical history/conditions per the form.
Does he have any paper work proving he has autism? Second opinions? Does he currently show any signs or symptoms? Medical records are disposed of after 6 years, it doesn't make much sense to go in and disclose that you have autism if you show no signs, and have no personal proof of the degree of diagnoses. Without paper or physical proof it might as well be made up.
 

exneophyte

Well-Known Member
Does he have any paper work proving he has autism? Second opinions? Does he currently show any signs or symptoms?
The medical application doesn't ask if you have paperwork proof. It asks, "HAVE YOU EVER IN YOUR LIFE BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH, HAD, OR DO YOU PRESENTLY HAVE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING?"
  • Neurological disorders: epilepsy, seizures, stroke, paralysis, etc.
  • Mental disorders of any sort: depression, anxiety, etc.
  • Other illness, disability, or surgery

Medical records are disposed of after 6 years, it doesn't make much sense to go in and disclose that you have autism if you show no signs, and have no personal proof of the degree of diagnoses.
You mean aside from the potential for $250,000 in fines and up to 5 years in prison for someone who "knowingly and willingly falsifies, conceals or covers up by any trick, scheme, or device a material fact, or who makes any false, fictitious or fraudulent statements or representations, or entry"?
 
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MaRiO FDZ

Han Solo is NOT dead!!
Back in the day when I was a kid and there was no such thing as Asperger's syndrome, either you were full blown autist or you weren't, I certainly would have qualified to that Asperger's back then as I can relate from memory the cfull lines from the original 3 star wars movies, know dates of most of WW2 significant events and almost all of the Mercury/Gemini/Apollo program astronauts in order, who won what Indycar race from 1996-2000, and I suck at non-verbal communications. Most people consider it freaky but I guess as human beings, they fear what they don't understand and just go with what feels right, regardless if it is. And I've had 1st class medicals, so, I don't think that given the elocquency of your writing you'd have a problem getting one.
 
This stuff drives me nuts. If you really want to get your blood pressure spiking, check out "Oppositional Defiant Disorder." Apparently that's one of the new alphabet soup of disorders that our children keep getting because we don't care enough to find real solutions to problems.
Some really good examples of Oppositional Defiance Disorder/ Conduct Disorder in youths:


 
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