EMS career options

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
#42
Yeah, that's good. I think often the stress level is what we make it. I hope I can figure out how to be on call without feeling under pressure.
Also watch out for the step when you open the side door on the amber lamps. It’s second nature now, but the first time you’ll rack your shins.
 

astrowhip

Well-Known Member
#43
Anyone have any info on SevenBar's Boston MedFlight BE20 operation out of KBED? Just saw that they posted an opening. Curious what the pay, schedule, etc. is like. Thanks.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
#44
Anyone have any info on SevenBar's Boston MedFlight BE20 operation out of KBED? Just saw that they posted an opening. Curious what the pay, schedule, etc. is like. Thanks.
Seven Bar used to be a pretty competitive gig to get, but my knowledge of them dates to the depths of the recession so they might be considered a dump in today’s environment, I don’t know.
 

deadstick

Well-Known Member
#45
Seven Bar used to be a pretty competitive gig to get, but my knowledge of them dates to the depths of the recession so they might be considered a dump in today’s environment, I don’t know.

They seem to have vacancies a couple of time per year.

FWIW there’s another B200 EMS operator who has a West Coast vacancy....although it’s rather hot (and smokey) there right now.
 

deadstick

Well-Known Member
#49
Congrats!

As a new King Air pilot, especially coming from 121, did anybody talk to you about the friction locks and the issues with the performance numbers?
 

gotWXdagain

Highly Visible Member
#52
Performance numbers, yes. If there was anything about friction locks I'm not remembering it now.:rolleyes:
If you see one of the engine torques dropping during climbout, glance at the corresponding power lever. It’ll probably be moving to decrease. Reset power, tighten friction lock, enjoy.

I’ve heard they can snap back when they’re really loose, but I’ve only seen creep.
 

nibake

Powder hound
#53
I had that happen to me in a Mooney once. Scary stuff. The only related problem I've had is that the power levers can be very sticky on one of our airplanes, sometimes with just a little movement and the torque jumps up or down 200 ft/lbs.
 

deadstick

Well-Known Member
#54
If you see one of the engine torques dropping during climbout, glance at the corresponding power lever. It’ll probably be moving to decrease. Reset power, tighten friction lock, enjoy.

I’ve heard they can snap back when they’re really loose, but I’ve only seen creep.

They can snap back.

The first time it happened I couldn’t figure out why. After the second time, the IA told me the dirt/grime in the power quadrant can result in tension at the idle position and almost none at the top end. It’s usually the left side because the cable is shorter. This means the spring on the push rod at the other end has less resistance.

Here’s the thing: no afx because the engine is still working and the micro switch isn’t satisfied. So you have flat plate drag hanging out there at precisely the wrong time—it snapped back when the pilot moves his/her right hand from the PL to the gear handle. Do they complete the procedure, put the right hand on the yoke, or better yet, verify Power Maximum Allowable? When the investigators get there, there is no obvious malfunction in the engine and they have to come up with possible answers like water contamination.

Read up on the crashes at TUS, LGB, ICT, and YMEN for starters. All went to the left. No survivors.
 
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