EMS career options

deadstick

Well-Known Member
#21
More often than not with EMS the flights wind up at the evening hour and go through the backside of the dial. Ever notice how we start getting busy right near hospital's shift change?
or Friday afternoon between 3-4p. The attending is on call that weekend and doesn’t really want to come in.

There really is no rhyme or reason. When I was at a community-based op, the night shift usually flew more. Now at the hospital-based one, the day shift does. Then again, we have done 3 flights in one night.
 

nibake

Powder hound
#28
The whole reason I'm looking at the job is that it is where I live, so no commuting. There is a long enough call out (30 mins) that I don't have to stay at the airport, either. I have been told that getting called right about when you are falling asleep is not at all uncommon.
I'm still uncertain how difficult it would be to have to be on call so much, it's not something I've ever had to do before. I'm also wondering what if any good jobs can be found with a lot of 135 twin turbine PIC time vs the obvious 121 path.
 

deadstick

Well-Known Member
#29
I have been told that getting called right about when you are falling asleep is not at all uncommon.
I'm still uncertain how difficult it would be to have to be on call so much...
If you’re going to sleep towards the end of your duty period, it shouldn’t be a big deal...:stir:
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
#30
The whole reason I'm looking at the job is that it is where I live, so no commuting. There is a long enough call out (30 mins) that I don't have to stay at the airport, either. I have been told that getting called right about when you are falling asleep is not at all uncommon.
I'm still uncertain how difficult it would be to have to be on call so much, it's not something I've ever had to do before. I'm also wondering what if any good jobs can be found with a lot of 135 twin turbine PIC time vs the obvious 121 path.
How much is “on call so much”?
 

tlove482

Well-Known Member
#32
I'd consider myself "made it". 4/4 schedule in a large City so the qol is good. Pay is the only thing lacking but I'm happy with it. I don't have to make majors money to have a good life. BUT I am not a stereotypical pilot either. I don't drink and I relate more to the med crews than the other pilots.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
#36
It's pseudo-official. I left the 121 job and start training for medevac the week after next. I hope I enjoy it :) Everybody says the King Airs are fun to fly. Everyone also says getting called right when you lay down to sleep is great, too :aghast:
Honestly, I enjoy it. I can’t see myself doing it for 30 years like some of the guys in our program, but I like it. Plane is cool. Schedule is cool. Med crews are cool, or at least you don’t spend enough time with the same people to find out that they’re not. Low, low stress. I live less than 2 miles from the hangar so that makes a difference.
 

nibake

Powder hound
#37
Honestly, I enjoy it. I can’t see myself doing it for 30 years like some of the guys in our program, but I like it. Plane is cool. Schedule is cool. Med crews are cool, or at least you don’t spend enough time with the same people to find out that they’re not. Low, low stress. I live less than 2 miles from the hangar so that makes a difference.
Yeah, that's good. I think often the stress level is what we make it. I hope I can figure out how to be on call without feeling under pressure.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
#38
Yeah, that's good. I think often the stress level is what we make it. I hope I can figure out how to be on call without feeling under pressure.
If your co-workers are cool, after a while you won’t even notice because you’ll be too busy planning what’s cooking for dinner or watching movies or whatnot. Of course, my previous job was a 135 DOM where I literally had meals interrupted because “one of your airplanes landed in the grass short of the runway”. So compared to that, this is easy.
 
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