Do the high altitude controller's have real time access to the actual altitude of an airplane?

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
I’d have to look in one of my manuals, but I think there is provision for heading and airspeed (not just track and groundspeed) to be transmitted over ADSB though I don’t think any of the systems I messed with were set up to do it.
Our display shows ADSB info along with TCAS targets. An ADSB target has the ID tag as well as the altitude (which, like TCAS, defaults to reference our altitude). If we select the target we get ground speed shown as well. We can also access the target through the FMS and get heading, bearing to, wake category, and IAS information.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
Our display shows ADSB info along with TCAS targets. An ADSB target has the ID tag as well as the altitude (which, like TCAS, defaults to reference our altitude). If we select the target we get ground speed shown as well. We can also access the target through the FMS and get heading, bearing to, wake category, and IAS information.
Fancy part 25 shiz. I’ve only messed with part 23 stuff, mostly 978 not so much 1090.
 

Corporate Pilot

Well-Known Member
From the information I have gotten I believe ATC only sees Mode C altitude and does not have the ability to see the airplanes actual height at that time. I could not find any information on how the US is going to monitor RVSM aircraft using ADS-B but below is how Australia is doing it. They only process the data monthly. It looks like the every 2 year/1000 hour RVSM height monitoring in the US will be going away with ADS-B, one less thing to track.



ADS-B Height-Keeping Monitoring


ADS-B Height-Keeping Monitoring System (AHMS)
The use of ADS-B as a means to estimate ASE and comply with the ICAO Annex 6 Long Term Height-keeping Monitoring Requirements has been endorsed by ICAO following extensive joint research by Australia (AAMA) and the United States (FAA). With the global implementation of long term height monitoring requirements such a system provides a significantly low cost, efficient means to undertake long-term height-keeping monitoring without any operational impact on ADS-B equipped aircraft.
Area of Implementation
Currently, use of the AAMA AHMS is restricted to aircraft observed within the Australian ADS-B network. The AAMA is planning to extend the implementation to include the Indonesian FIRs in the future.
ADS-B Monitoring Description
ADS-B monitoring is undertaken by the AAMA through the monthly processing of large data sets of ADS-B messages captured in the Australian network. The data is processed to enable the calculation of altimetry system errors for each ADS-B message obtained from a specific aircraft or group of aircraft. A final assessed ASE value is then calculated for each observed aircraft.
ADS-B messages used for Height-Keeping Monitoring must include geometric height. Operators wishing to participate in ADS-B Height-Keeping Monitoring must ensure that geometric height is included in transmitted ADS-B messages.
Monitoring Process
The monitoring process used by the AAMA is as follows:
  1. Extract and process ADS-B data from the Australian network each month. ASE calculations will be completed and reviewed to identify any airframes that may be indicating height-keeping errors close to or exceeding acceptable limits.
  2. Notify relevant State authorities of aircraft that demonstrate aberrant height-keeping capability so that those authorities may take corrective action as required by provisions of Annex 6.
  3. Publish to its web site information on the last successful monitoring date of aircraft fully RVSM approved by the State authorities of Australia, Indonesia, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Timor-Leste.
  4. Provide information to other Regional Monitoring Agencies (RMAs) of the last successful monitoring date of aircraft fully RVSM approved by State authorities other than for those States for which the AAMA is responsible. The relevant RMA will publish the information obtained from the AAMA in this way, on its web site.
 
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