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Do I file a NASA report?

Discussion in 'Ask An Aviation Attorney' started by ozone, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. ozone

    ozone Well-Known Member

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    I had an incident the other day where a fuel line got loose, we lost power until I turned the boost pump on, and I did a precautionary landing after declaring an emergency. Mechanic found a loose nut holding the line into the mechanical fuel pump. Is that the kind of thing to file a NASA report about?

    SR-20 gen. 2, for those who are curious
     
  2. milleR

    milleR Well-Known Member

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    You can't really go wrong filing one, but unless you unintentially violated an FAR or ATC instruction it probably isn't necessary.
     
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  3. gotWXdagain

    gotWXdagain Highly Visible Member

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    Sounds like you should file your mechanic's future solicitations in a round bin.
     
  4. ppragman

    ppragman Direct BOOKE

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    Always file a NASA report.
     
  5. dustoff17

    dustoff17 Well-Known Member

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    THIS!!
    The NASA report is something that we use to help protect us at times. However, it really does serve as a functional data analysis for everything from ATC procedures to mechanical issues. It never hurts to file one.
     
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  6. Autothrust Blue

    Autothrust Blue "This is a God damn waste of time!"

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    The reporting incentive isn't, or shouldn't be, the primary reason to file an ASRS; that said, it's certainly a good thing. The primary purpose is to enhance aviation safety through data collection and analysis. That which cannot be collected or measured cannot be analyzed and addressed.

    Yeah.

    Oh, and air carrier pilots with an ASAP program...have your ASAP system send it to ASRS too.
     
  7. milleR

    milleR Well-Known Member

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    While fundamentally I agree with you, I'm not sure you've got the true nature of system with regards to the OP's question straight.

    https://asrs.arc.nasa.gov/report/caveat.html?formType=general

    A mechanical emergency does not necessarily constitute an issue in the aviation system which needs to be addressed, in this particular case barring some kind of obstruction created by ATC or anther element of the system.
     
  8. inigo88

    inigo88 Composite-lover

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    It's much broader than that, although I had to look it up also to confirm.

    See Immunity Policy, AC 00-46E:
    https://asrs.arc.nasa.gov/overview/immunity.html

     
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  9. milleR

    milleR Well-Known Member

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    That's really good to know, thank you.

    I would posit that in the OP's case, unless there was a maintenance entry missing or wrong, an ASRS report still wouldn't be necessary.

    A mechanical malfunction doesn't necessarily preclude an ASRS. Landing and realizing that "whoops, yeah that annual was due 2 days ago" or "oh my, that fuel line mx wasn't documented and logged (or if required, signed off on)" does.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017 at 19:38
  10. inigo88

    inigo88 Composite-lover

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    I fundamentally agree on its purpose to report compromises of safety within the NAS, and that routine maintenance issues aren't really the intent.

    I doubt it's applicable in this case... But I do wonder if his fuel line let loose departing an airport after being serviced by a certain repair station on field, and that airport had a long laundry list of similar maintenance issues, if someone would eventually take notice? :stir:

    ^ (Probably not, I think those types of patterns would eventually be caught by the mandatory accident and incident reporting requirements in NTSB 830.)
     
  11. Roger Roger

    Roger Roger Navajo Whisperer

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    This would be more applicable to an SDR, and even that is not really supposed to be for maintenance errors so unless it's something in the design of the fuel line that causes it to come loose doesn't really apply.
     

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