Do a lot of people wash out of dispatcher school?

A1TAPE

Well-Known Member
#21
Thinking about falling behind when they themselves are focused on each flight's safe, legal release

Not using readily available resources in other dispatchers

Smoking/sniffing glue/taking amphetamines

Finding good ways to reference Airplane! in daily life
Is that what they say they look like or are they called "a big Tylenol" because they give people headaches?
 

ak_mavic

Well-Known Member
#22
In my class there were seven of us. I was the only one to get their certificate by graduation. I followed up with the school a year later and most dropped out, with about two still actively trying to obtain their certificate. As for my company, I’d say about 25% of new hires don’t get signed off.
 

mrezee

Living the dream!
#23
I was talking to my mom one day and she told me "You are the slowest one in the office. You suck. You are NEW! Give it time." (It was funny, guess you had to be there.)
I think I'll remember that forever!
That's great advice. You'll always make mistakes as you're learning, but with some hard work and a desire to learn, you'll be up to speed in no time.

When I was going for ATC, something my ATC professor in college used to say was "when you get to your facility, you don't know nothing about nothing." Despite being a triple-negative, it was good advice to be humble and ready to absorb information and advice from those around you. Don't be cocky and act like a know-it-all or your new coworkers will quickly despise working with you. Unfortunately we've had a few of those start at my shop lately....
 

A-9er

Well-Known Member
#24
At Sheffield this past April and May we had like 39 start; we filled both classrooms initially. Only 13 of us got our tickets. That said, a few people had to leave due to personal issues, and I don't know if any of them made plans to return to school.
 
#25
That's incredible. I was in a class of 9 and as far as I know, we all passed. Some struggled, but we had a great instructor to guide us through. I think I am the only 121 dispatcher from the group.
 

av8or757

Well-Known Member
#34
I never knocked the ramp or rampers; how could I when I once worked there myself? I was a fueler long ago, and I have respect for the rampers and what they do...
No kidding. It's a very thankless job. If anything if you've done it, you'll appreciate any position outside of ramp if you make it off the ramp.
 

autosave36

Well-Known Member
#35
Im just curious if a good amount of people washed out of your class. It was a lot more difficult than I thought it would be. The only people who thought it was easy were guys in my class who were already dispatchers or had an aviation degree. I think about 25-30 percent of my class washed out and were not signed off.They were the ones with no aviation experience or English wasn't their first language.I had no aviation experience,but got lucky and studied my butt off.The teacher made it seem like from day that everyone will pass...lol .One guy just walked out of class, and left because he was so stressed out.
It's not luck that you did well, you earned it. Good job there. Second, I'd say the things that determine whether you are going to pass are 1. how hard you work at it. (by far) 2. If you have an aptitude/passion for the subject matter and 3. how well you use others. my class used each other as resources as well as our materials and aside from the 2 people who were taking it a second time, everyone passed and most of us are working in dispatch now.

After class, like everyone said, thunderstorm season... Have a nice NY Irop on your first day signed off and then you'll know if you wasted your money to take the classes and everything.
 

A-9er

Well-Known Member
#37
It's not luck that you did well, you earned it. Good job there. Second, I'd say the things that determine whether you are going to pass are 1. how hard you work at it. (by far) 2. If you have an aptitude/passion for the subject matter and 3. how well you use others. my class used each other as resources as well as our materials and aside from the 2 people who were taking it a second time, everyone passed and most of us are working in dispatch now.

After class, like everyone said, thunderstorm season... Have a nice NY Irop on your first day signed off and then you'll know if you wasted your money to take the classes and everything.
I had an IROP day on my THIRD SHIFT! That's right; the third shift after being signed off was an IROP day. The funny thing is that this was in October; during the second week of October, we had a day that was more like a June or July day with a cold front spawning thunderstorms across much of the nation. That was NOT fun...
 

autosave36

Well-Known Member
#39
I had an IROP day on my THIRD SHIFT! That's right; the third shift after being signed off was an IROP day. The funny thing is that this was in October; during the second week of October, we had a day that was more like a June or July day with a cold front spawning thunderstorms across much of the nation. That was NOT fun...
Yeah I feel you. I had the same thing happen only it was my first day signed off. New York totally melted down due to storms rolling in.. reroutes everywhere, people trying to get a hold of me, trying to make routes around thunderstorms and had a bunch of gate returns due to 2 hour taxis. Finally 8 hours into my shift i finally got a chance to catch my breath. Funny enough it was my birthday. But as bad/stressful as that was, it was still way more enjoyable than my last job so I stuck with it.
 
#40
From my experience between 15-20% dropped out
back in Sheffield (However some had to leave due to problems unrelated to school, so the number is around 10% which was school related)
The best thing to do is simply study with a fellow classmate. And ask your instructors
That checks with my class at Sheff as well. Class of 11, 9 graduated. If I remember correctly, the 2 that didn't had no aviation experience entering the class. All others did.
 
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