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Do a lot of people wash out of dispatcher school?

Anthony18216

Well-Known Member
#1
Im just curious if a good amount of people washed out of your class. It was a lot more difficult than I thought it would be. The only people who thought it was easy were guys in my class who were already dispatchers or had an aviation degree. I think about 25-30 percent of my class washed out and were not signed off.They were the ones with no aviation experience or English wasn't their first language.I had no aviation experience,but got lucky and studied my butt off.The teacher made it seem like from day that everyone will pass...lol .One guy just walked out of class, and left because he was so stressed out.
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
#3
We had a few wash out or quit in my class twenty plus years ago. I think about 3 or 4 of the class of approximately 20 didn't get their ticket.
 

SpaceBeagle

Located in Low Earth Orbit
#6
Why would people who are already dispatchers be taking a dispatch course?
They were probably working for some sort of "flight following" service, and never got their FAA license.

Your first thunderstorm season is always a bit challenging, but as long as you do what you are trained and use the weather resources available you should be fine. With time you find out what works and what doesn't work too well. Don't forget about the more experienced vets around you, they're a pretty good source of knowledge as well!
 
#8
Im just curious if a good amount of people washed out of your class. It was a lot more difficult than I thought it would be. The only people who thought it was easy were guys in my class who were already dispatchers or had an aviation degree. I think about 25-30 percent of my class washed out and were not signed off.They were the ones with no aviation experience or English wasn't their first language.I had no aviation experience,but got lucky and studied my butt off.The teacher made it seem like from day that everyone will pass...lol .One guy just walked out of class, and left because he was so stressed out.
It’s not going to be for everyone. Don’t worry about that, just worry about yourself.
 
#12
In my class this past summer, my class had about 24-25 people. Of those, about 11 of us made it through. I thought it was a challenge but I studied my ass off daily and it that definitely pushed me through. So my advice would be just to study the material and study well but also enjoy it. I had a lot of fun and met some cool people.
 

Burrito

I'll ask the stupid questions
#14
Thinking about falling behind when they themselves are focused on each flight's safe, legal release

Not using readily available resources in other dispatchers

Smoking/sniffing glue/taking amphetamines

Finding good ways to reference Airplane! in daily life
 
#15
Thinking about falling behind when they themselves are focused on each flight's safe, legal release

Not using readily available resources in other dispatchers

Smoking/sniffing glue/taking amphetamines

Finding good ways to reference Airplane! in daily life
I remember when I first started at my current job (not dispatch) and I felt slightly overwhelmed and like I took forever to do my job.

I was talking to my mom one day and she told me "You are the slowest one in the office. You suck. You are NEW! Give it time." (It was funny, guess you had to be there.)
I think I'll remember that forever!
 

av8or757

Well-Known Member
#16
It's a lot of information you're dealing with. On top of you need to make very important decisions and quickly. Everything can going on at once. And people are looking to you for an answer or update. Something lol

For me personally...I just think of the many,many, many years of getting my ass handed to me daily. Tossing bags,freight and God knows what in the bins of planes headed to/from central or South america. Or Hub to Hub flights with 12,13,14K of payload.

Dispatch can have its rough days.....But it beats tossing bags and beating the hell out of your body by a country mile.

That alone should motivate one to stay with dispatch and try to improve at what you can when possible. Ask coworkers/Sups what you can do better or work on. Then do it. Treat it as any job. You can always learn something new, or a new or easier way to do it. Knowing what the job entails and calls for before getting your license/first job would help. If you like the operations side of aviation or nuts and bolts you'll like it long term.

There are worse things I can be doing in aviation.

I've done the ramp and baggage resolution. Trust me:D
 
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A1TAPE

Active Member
#17
Thinking about falling behind when they themselves are focused on each flight's safe, legal release

Not using readily available resources in other dispatchers

Smoking/sniffing glue/taking amphetamines

Finding good ways to reference Airplane! in daily life
Not calling 737s or 757s "a big Tylenol"
 

CrippleHawk

Well-Known Member
#20
From my experience between 15-20% dropped out
back in Sheffield (However some had to leave due to problems unrelated to school, so the number is around 10% which was school related)
The best thing to do is simply study with a fellow classmate. And ask your instructors