Dispatcher Pay Spreadsheet

A-9er

Well-Known Member
I actually get to move back to Texas (that’s home for me!). Going to be working under a weather consulting firm that’s expanding into Aviation.

Should be a great move. The pay is better, I get to geek out on weather, I’ll be able to take some college, and I get to go home and be closer to family.
Sounds like it'll a great move! Being close to family is just icing on the cake... :)
 

jbhems520

Well-Known Member
Does that account for time in service?
It does, to an extent. The company 'may' recognize previous aircraft dispatching experience, and the new hire could be put in three year rate pay scale up front. However, you'll remain at that pay scale until you gain more than three years worth of seniority within the company (excluding the small pay raise each year at the date of signing anniversary of the contract, if I'm reading it correctly). Hope that answers your question.
 

A-9er

Well-Known Member
It does, to an extent. The company 'may' recognize previous aircraft dispatching experience, and the new hire could be put in three year rate pay scale up front. However, you'll remain at that pay scale until you gain more than three years worth of seniority within the company (excluding the small pay raise each year at the date of signing anniversary of the contract, if I'm reading it correctly). Hope that answers your question.
I was more curious if the top-out pay rate took time with the company into account. That is to say, is the top out quoted a "Year 0" number, or is it a "Year X" number, X being the number of years needed to reach top-out?
 

DispatchDan

Well-Known Member
I was more curious if the top-out pay rate took time with the company into account. That is to say, is the top out quoted a "Year 0" number, or is it a "Year X" number, X being the number of years needed to reach top-out?
Way to break it down. I think you confused me even more. If I understand the question then the answer is that everybody does not start all over from year 0 every time you get a new contract, so if you have been working there for 5 years and they get a new contract with a new pay scale then you fall right in year 5 of that new pay scale.
Was that your question?
 

A-9er

Well-Known Member
Way to break it down. I think you confused me even more. If I understand the question then the answer is that everybody does not start all over from year 0 every time you get a new contract, so if you have been working there for 5 years and they get a new contract with a new pay scale then you fall right in year 5 of that new pay scale.
Was that your question?
Not quite, though that helped me get a better understanding. I guess my question is this: when they talk about the 'top out' of a contract, is that a year 0 number? That is to say, if the top out is $25.15 at a regional, would that be a year 0 number on the contract, or would that be year X, X being the number of years it takes to top out per the contract? Does that make sense?
 

fuelerdx

Well-Known Member
Not quite, though that helped me get a better understanding. I guess my question is this: when they talk about the 'top out' of a contract, is that a year 0 number? That is to say, if the top out is $25.15 at a regional, would that be a year 0 number on the contract, or would that be year X, X being the number of years it takes to top out per the contract? Does that make sense?
It's years of service at the company. Not sure what you mean by year zero. You start at zero and move up with years of service. If you have five at signing then you are at five.

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A-9er

Well-Known Member
It's years of service at the company. Not sure what you mean by year zero. You start at zero and move up with years of service. If you have five at signing then you are at five.

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I think what I'm trying to ask is this: does top out remain the same once you reach it, or are there cost of living adjustments? IOW, if top out is 13 years and you have 15 years in, would you be making the same as someone with 13 and 14 years in?
 

fuelerdx

Well-Known Member
I think what I'm trying to ask is this: does top out remain the same once you reach it, or are there cost of living adjustments? IOW, if top out is 13 years and you have 15 years in, would you be making the same as someone with 13 and 14 years in?
Top of scale is top of scale. Scales usually have adjustments year by year though for cost of living.

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TXDX

Well-Known Member
I think what I'm trying to ask is this: does top out remain the same once you reach it, or are there cost of living adjustments? IOW, if top out is 13 years and you have 15 years in, would you be making the same as someone with 13 and 14 years in?
To plainly answer the question is yes. But, and a huge but, most contracts have a longevity pay attached. So as an example, you are about to start a new class. There are two of you. The gal next to you has been with that company 6 years prior to becoming a dispatcher in training. As far as company seniority, shes already got six years on you. But right now that doesn't matter as you will both be making what contract says because its occupational seniority.

12 years later both of you reach top out pay. You and her are now, per contract, going to start making longevity pay. For every year you both have been with the company, you will get xx amount per hour more. You will get your 12 years and she will get her 18 years. So, yep, she will be out making you. Hope this kind of helps.
 
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