Dispatcher Job Prospects?

MT

Well-Known Member
Can't speak for any other airlines, but Alaska does have a job-share provision in their contract. You won't get hired as "part-time", and I don't think anyone is actually taking advantage of this option right now, but the possibility is there.
At Delta when you get all of your vacation time and days off you can work 142 days in the year. That's pretty dang close to part time.
 

CRJInTheHeartOfTexas

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Outlook is the program they use for email, yes. However you have to be an American employee to access it. It's part of the Microsoft Office suite but there's also a web-based program for accessing corporate email from the internet.
You're a funny guy manniax. But I'm serious, I haven't seen them hiring at all so I'm a bit concerned about their prospects. It would not be to my beneift to get my license if all these jobs get oversatuarated.
 

CRJInTheHeartOfTexas

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Inappropriate
its very easy for the lameanniax planefail82 ecolichipotleburrito and cpzdouche9900 to be negative when yall are sitting pretty at a major. Your negativity is only going to make me work harder and without question succeed in this field. I'll be enrolled in a class this week. yall cant stop me from accomplishing my goals and i certainly dont need your blessing.
 
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PlaneFan82

Well-Known Member
its very easy for the lameanniax planefail82 ecolichipotleburrito and cpzdouche9900 to be negative when yall are sitting pretty at a major. Your negativity is only going to make me work harder and without question succeed in this field. I'll be enrolled in a class this week. yall cant stop me from accomplishing my goals and i certainly dont need your blessing.
You have proven that you don't want to do the work or research. We are all here to help. Like my Dad said, "Talk's Cheap, Money builds houses". Good luck in class. Work hard, learn about the biz.


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manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
its very easy for the lameanniax planefail82 ecolichipotleburrito and cpzdouche9900 to be negative when yall are sitting pretty at a major. Your negativity is only going to make me work harder and without question succeed in this field. I'll be enrolled in a class this week. yall cant stop me from accomplishing my goals and i certainly dont need your blessing.
"lameanniax"...I kind of like that one. Anyhow, if you think if everyone on this board who is now at a major didn't work hard to get there, you are sadly mistaken. Hard work seems to be something you have an aversion to, based on your reaction to all our advice thus far, but hey! If you don't like what we are saying, prove us wrong! Go to school, get your license, apply away, and get hired by an airline. Then come back here and tell us how mistaken we were about you. In the meantime, please stop expecting us to give you honest advice, since you seem to love questioning or ignoring said advice one it's been provided.

Sincerely, "Lameanniax, Destroyer of Daydreams"
 
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pljenkins

Resident Knucklehead
its very easy for the lameanniax planefail82 ecolichipotleburrito and cpzdouche9900 to be negative when yall are sitting pretty at a major. Your negativity is only going to make me work harder and without question succeed in this field. I'll be enrolled in a class this week. yall cant stop me from accomplishing my goals and i certainly dont need your blessing.
Heres-your-shovel-Keep-digging-36e1ee.jpg.b1c5d6e1659339110f4024ddffad523e.jpg
 

kalan31

Well-Known Member
I've been dispatching for a few months now, and I love it. Best career move of my life. But I've been wondering, with future technological advances and automation, what are the odds that this job will still exist in 20 or 30 years? I know there isn't a definite answer on that, just trying to figure out if this a job I'll retire from or not.
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
I've been dispatching for a few months now, and I love it. Best career move of my life. But I've been wondering, with future technological advances and automation, what are the odds that this job will still exist in 20 or 30 years? I know there isn't a definite answer on that, just trying to figure out if this a job I'll retire from or not.
Well...people have been predicting the end of the profession since the early 1970's, and we're still going strong, so I think your odds are good. The job responsibilities could evolve over time, of course. The thing is, SOMEONE has to be doing our job...flight planning, monitoring, etc. and unless the FAA changes its regulations, I don't see the airlines ever being able to contract that responsibility away from them. And the FAA is notoriously slow to change its regulations. I think the recent Malaysia airlines flight that went missing, along with the Air France crash, highlighted the importance of having someone on the ground monitoring your airline's flights...and to be honest, I can't understand why someone would want to contract out such a core function of your airline's business, especially since dispatchers provide a lot of safety to your operation for a very low cost. I do remember someone telling me at a regional I was at back in the late 90's when he was planning to leave the profession, "So, you think you'll have a job in ten years?" Time has proven him to be incorrect and I think it will prove other naysayers to be wrong also. I am happy to have left the regionals behind, especially during the transition to mandatory Part 121 for all planes with 10 seats or more, since the attitude of management seemed to be "those lazy bastards mandated upon us by the FAA" and moved on to a major, where dispatch is seen as a very important part of the operation. (Note: not all regionals feel that way, I just got "lucky" where I was at.)
 

pljenkins

Resident Knucklehead
Technology is certainly evolving that includes providing pilots with some of the visibility to conditions that previously were exclusively available to dispatchers, but keep in mind that the workload of the flight crews hasn't substantially changed. There are two crewmembers where there used to be 3 and airspace is more congested and complicated.

It's important to remember how the dispatcher position came to be. As with most FAA rules, they came about because some pilots ended up becoming dead pilots because of a lack of proper planning and bad decision making. The FAA, and to a large extent the airlines, decided that killing people and destroying equipment wasn't something they were interested in continuing and figured the flying public might take a dim view to it also, so they decided that a "pilot on the ground" who could watch over things and work with the crew to make better decisions might lead to more positive outcomes, and it did. The bottom line is, the FAA is very weary about eliminating any safety related regulations, which is why you will likely never, in your lifetime, see a single pilot airliner operating Part 121 nor will you see a flight launch without a dispatcher on duty for that flight. In time will either or both of those scenarios be viable? SURE! Hell, we have airplanes flying themselves all over God and Country, but most passengers aren't gonna buy that for a dollar, and sure as Hell the FAA won't.
 
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