Diplopia (double vision)

an8pilot

New Member
Hello, I really appreciate you moderating this forum.
Here is my question that I can't seem to find information about out on the web.


The Guide for Aviation Medical Examiners has the below where I copy pasted to say about diplopia (double vision.)

But it doesn't go into just what is "written evidence that the FAA has previously considered and determined that this condition is not adverse to flight safety."

It doesn't say anything about whether it is being measured with corrective aids or without glasses.

The person I am asking about has double vision that was caused by trauma in a car accident where a choroidal rupture happened underneath the retina at the back of the eye and is at final healing stage and is not getting any better. The double vision is only at the central portion of vision due to the disturbance of the choroidal layer having a small split under the retina which had moved the retina foveal center there slightly. The peripheral vision is normal. It is not moving or changing and has reached maximum healing.

The central vision doube vision has been corrected with glasses.

But the manual doesn't mentin correction.

For a person to have 20/20 corrected distant he may need glasses.
If he doesn't wear glasses he would not have the required corrected 20/20 vision.

Wouldn't this be the same with double vision. I mean no double vision is allowed. Nor is less than 20/20 corrected allowed. But the 20/20 corrected can be obtained by glasses.
And the no double vision in the central sight can be obtained by glasses as well.

Again just what is "written evidence that the FAA has previously considered and determined that this condition is not adverse to flight safety."

This person, my Uncle, has over ten thousand hours and is in his early forties in the mid part of his career and has no other work experience. He has worked amazingly hard to get where he has without all the diplomas most have and now someone has carelessly caused this to him without any recourse whatsoever. There is nothing to do but try to continue on.

He has been continuing to fly while he has been healing in the right seat of an airplane that does not require a co pilot. He has had no problem operating the aircraft through all its operations and says he doesn't even notice any problem while operating.


What do you think? There seems to be nobody to talk to that has any knowledge of this.

VERSION V
OF THE
GUIDE FOR AVIATION MEDICAL EXAMINERS


III. Aerospace Medical Disposition [FONT=Arial,Arial]1. First- and Second-class: If an applicant exceeds the heterophoria standards (1 prism diopter of hyperphoria, 6 prism diopters of esophoria, or 6 prism diopters of exophoria), but shows no evidence of diplopia or serious eye pathology and all other aspects of the examination are favorable, the Examiner should not withhold or deny the medical certificate. The applicant should be advised that the FAA may require further examination by a qualified eye specialist. [/FONT]

[FONT=Arial,Arial]CONDITION: Diplopia [/FONT]

[FONT=Arial,Arial]CLASS(of medical): All [/FONT]

[FONT=Arial,Arial]EVALUATION DATA: If applicant provides written evidence that the FAA has previously considered and determined that this condition is not adverse to flight safety. A Medical Flight Test may be requested. [/FONT]

[FONT=Arial,Arial]DISPOSITION: Contact Regional Flight Surgeon for approval to Issue. Otherwise - Requires FAA Decision [/FONT]
 

My Flight Surgeon

Sr. Aviation Medical Examiner
They will want to see a Form 8500-7 completed by the ophthalmologist. Your ophthalmologist should provide ALL of the relevant information on the form for them to review. Their experts review the data and make a recommendation to the FAA.
 
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