Delta co-pilot busted in AMS

mrivc211

Well-Known Member
I used to hate the term “co-pilot” but seems like all the old timers here at the SJI use it...I guess it’s kind of growing on me. However, it is annoying when talking to non pilots “are you the pilot or just the co-pilot, does the pilot ever let you fly” :rolleyes:
People have said a lot worse to @Derg
 

Hacker15e

Just Happy To Be Here
“My assistant to the captain, the co-captain since he is PIC type-rated, would like a coffee with one cream, please”
So long as there's only one guy who has to sign his name on the release, the "other guy" up in that room in the front of the airplane will remain an assistant.
 

Autothrust Blue

Ultra-low-cost member
So long as there's only one guy who has to sign his name on the release, the "other guy" up in that room in the front of the airplane will remain an assistant.
Our releases have blanks for both pilots, but that's more a fit for duty statement than anything else. The verbiage does say both pilots agree with the flight as planned, but meh.
 

GypsyPilot

Well-Known Member
My take is that co- means "together, mutually, in common," so really the captain is my co-pilot.
Next time you’re flying with some crusty old CA, make sure you introduce him as your “co-pilot” to the hotel staff/van driver/etc. I bet that will go great!
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
So long as there's only one guy who has to sign his name on the release, the "other guy" up in that room in the front of the airplane will remain an assistant.
We both have to sign it at southernJets but I feel ya! :)
 

CFIscare

Well-Known Member
I would rather be called Co-pilot than Co-captain by the actual captain on his welcome PA. While we are on that subject, I also have no desire to have my flight hours or resume broadcasted over that same PA as well.
 
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