Dear survey pilots

A80TRACON

I do the best imitation of myself
#64
It's a conscience effort not to clear Air China for the IRS 22 reft
Pretty sure it was a STAR into JFK, that we at ZBW Area E were tweaking in the 80's, that we loaded the intersections with double and triple L's for JAL and KAL.

Also, used to call approach and, whenever they'd ask for direct LENDY advise that they were requesting direct Wendy's.

Ah, to be 21 and racist again :oops:
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
#65
I'll remember that next time someone assigns me 11 with a 10kt tailwind :)
#RAsallDay
If it makes you feel any better us line controllers fight those stupid runway assignments too but management insists. Like today, the winds were "forecast" to shift so they made us switch to 22's while the winds were still 35010g18. Which meant TEB had to switch to 19 and I got to hear all those pilots complain (rightly so). Then we bitch at management and they're like well the winds are going to shift and we're like we don't care what they're going to do, look at what they're doing now! Seriously, management and TMU is the biggest hindrance to an efficient operation.
 
#66
Yeah, I think maybe you were still at FFC or CCO around the time I was getting ready to retire and head to the East in 2015. DA20 hornets nest.
Haha yeah I was mostly at CCO. I've been gone a little over a year now and I've heard its worse now. Over 200 Chinese kids a year now between CCO/FFC/AHN. Hornets Nest is about right.
 

greg1016

Trustworthy Source
#67
If it makes you feel any better us line controllers fight those stupid runway assignments too but management insists. Like today, the winds were "forecast" to shift so they made us switch to 22's while the winds were still 35010g18. Which meant TEB had to switch to 19 and I got to hear all those pilots complain (rightly so). Then we bitch at management and they're like well the winds are going to shift and we're like we don't care what they're going to do, look at what they're doing now! Seriously, management and TMU is the biggest hindrance to an efficient operation.
Not that big of a deal to spin a couple guys to facilitate a flow shift that corresponds with a wind shift. How many times does the TAF predict a wind shift and it never does? Or it shifts but not enough to align with a different runway. Happens all the time out here. I won't even start on TMU.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
#68
Not that big of a deal to spin a couple guys to facilitate a flow shift that corresponds with a wind shift. How many times does the TAF predict a wind shift and it never does? Or it shifts but not enough to align with a different runway. Happens all the time out here. I won't even start on TMU.
TMU doesn't pay attention to chit. We even have an FLM from our area who went TMU and it's like he completely brain dumped our operation. There'll be a 10kt+ tailwind and they tell us to start bringing 737's and smaller to 11 because they gave us a 60 hour flow rate. Then everyone keeps saying they can't take 11 so we wind up holding because we run out of room and TMU starts bitching.
 

SrFnFly227

Well-Known Member
#72
You know when your boss is like "take that plane" and you're like "no" due to safety concerns for whatever reason? When we say unable and they squawk 1200 it's kind of like if you took the plane.
It's not quite that simple when it's perfect weather and you're not going to be flying through any marked airspace. And for the record, New York was great to us during my time with Keystone. I had a great relationship with the managers at Tracon and with Newark Tower. Philadelphia was our biggest problem.

We were mapping the entire state of New Jersey at one point. We were obviously VFR and we were not in any marked airspace. We had coordinated with approach controls by faxing in maps and making phone calls ahead of time. New York was great and the guys in the area had zero problems. At one point Philly told one of our planes that we could no longer work the sections of lines close to PHL's airspace. Again, we were not even in their airspace. They told the pilot to do a 180 and leave the area. The pilot told the controller that he was going to continue his lines either on a code and on frequency or on his own squawking VFR. The controller still said he couldn't be there, so 1200 it was. They followed that plane all the way back to PNE and had the tower give the pilot a phone number. Our company's owner made the phone call for the pilot.

Now lines in the Class B is a different story. A good pilot knows the arrival and departure paths and would be able to tell ahead of time when he or she would be able to work certain lines. Winds from a certain direction would mean certain lines just weren't going to happen. Push times during the week, again not going to happen. Weekends were usually easier due to lower traffic volume.
 
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