daily pic

deadpixel

Well-Known Member
How’s it feel am to sit in the vapor ware jet?

Feels like that thing was nothing more than a rumor for a solid decade or two.


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Extremely nice and quiet! Everyone we flew is either coming out of a competitor airplane or been thinking buying one and spoke to the noise difference. Biggest plus is the extra length between club seats. Lots of smart design features (airstair door has a step that flips into a working table). For the one pilot we flew the next gen G3000 and automation (lights, icing, button layout) is a huge selling point for him. Still waiting for final GAMA figures but should be third year in a row most delivered light jet in category. Hoping to get the first sale here soon.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
I’ve been spending a lot ime with this ol’gal:
View attachment 51223
@ppragman (you called about a minute after I took this)
so I had to pull this ol’ladie out and take her for a spin this afternoon.
View attachment 51224

It’s important not to neglect your loved ones.
Those pictures make me happy I'm sitting on my couch with warm feet. When I was in A/P school it was drilled into our heads that carbon monoxide was absolutely deadly and the exhaust heat muffs that supplied heated air for the cabin heat were terribly built and most of them out in the field were likely already cracked and it was only a matter of time before an unsuspecting pilot would kill his entire family due to incapacitation. They would show slides or overhead projector pictures (long before computers or flat screens) of particularly neglected examples that had been disassembled at a shop. This scarred me, all of the way through getting my ppl in the mild climate of SoCal and the flying afterwards I refused to use the cabin heat. I know that the way it's designed if it's maintained properly it "should" be okay, but there is no way to properly inspect it for cracks while in service. Do you use cabin heat?
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
there is no way to properly inspect it for cracks while in service.
That is 100% false on all piston singles I have worked on. Not only are they accessible for inspection, if you know what to look for you can catch them before failure. Nonetheless, I’m ecstatic that some of the new gadgets like the Foreflight Scout have built in CO detectors with audible warning.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
That is 100% false on all piston singles I have worked on. Not only are they accessible for inspection, if you know what to look for you can catch them before failure. Nonetheless, I’m ecstatic that some of the new gadgets like the Foreflight Scout have built in CO detectors with audible warning.
I have almost no experience working on piston singles. The only one I spent much time around had no provisions for keeping the pilot warm. It's almost as if I skipped a step in my journey.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
I have almost no experience working on piston singles. The only one I spent much time around had no provisions for keeping the pilot warm. It's almost as if I skipped a step in my journey.
Most older stuff has a 50 hour AD for exhaust inspection. The way they used to make exhaust(maybe the still do) is to not worry about the stress the metal was under once installed and expanded due to heat. The welds you see on the vintage stuff is something I'd expect to come out of a High School shop class, not an aircraft factory.
My current exhaust, built by probably the most prolific exhaust builder in the industry is nothing like that. I can inspect it on pre-flight and the heat muffs are on an area that is about the least likely to crack. Bonus that there are no welds involved in that area.
 
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