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daily pic

Lawman

Well-Known Member
Backseat that day. On a non combat mission though it really makes no difference. Only thing unique to the front seat is the ability to exercise the TADS and guide laser guided weapons.
Interesting. I always thought the pilot was always the one up front, and the navigator controlled the weapons. Or maybe I just need to stop watching Firebirds.
In the Tiger (Eurocopter From Goldeneye) they do put the primary pilot station up front with the gunner in back. A model Apache emulated what the original Cobra and its predecessor the Sioux Scout did, put a gunner up front because of the mechanical linkages between the turret and the aiming system. The cockpits predated glass designs so they were optimized to a specific job. Guys grew up junior in the front seat it’s the idea of mastering gunner skills before they moved to the back as an aircraft commander with total understanding so they could coach junior guys. Some of that attitude lasted into the D model as just good practices and it was the way I grew up as a gunner first.

Now days it’s dual seat everything. Good in some ways but I can see a clear difference in what I and my peers could do as a 400 hour junior pilot and our current crops of dual seat guys doing same.

You’ve gotta fly time in both seats for currency though. Plus in certain mission modes it’s good to deliberately place a guy in a particular seat. When I’m flying as the air mission commander of some complex multi aircraft mission for example I usually fly in the front because I can worry about and give commands to all 4-8 aircraft instead of trying to fly mine and worry about the other 7.


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Lawman

Well-Known Member
Any chance you parked that beast at STS yesterday?
No but I know all of the guys that did. We’ve had a real trail of tears getting 8 aircraft to where we needed them. Part of the problem when you stop flying these things is like any other they break sitting.

I was in STS on Wednesday though. Nice airport. Way more facilities than where we stoped the night before (K0Q5).


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CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
No but I know all of the guys that did. We’ve had a real trail of tears getting 8 aircraft to where we needed them. Part of the problem when you stop flying these things is like any other they break sitting.

I was in STS on Wednesday though. Nice airport. Way more facilities than where we stoped the night before (K0Q5).


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Gotcha, I was passing through STS and saw one on the ramp. It stood out since it isn't the usual sort of ride people take to go on a wine tasting trip.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
No but I know all of the guys that did. We’ve had a real trail of tears getting 8 aircraft to where we needed them. Part of the problem when you stop flying these things is like any other they break sitting.

I was in STS on Wednesday though. Nice airport. Way more facilities than where we stoped the night before (K0Q5).


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Gotcha, I was passing through STS and saw one on the ramp. It stood out since it isn't the usual sort of ride people take to go on a wine tasting trip.
I begged to take the cross country through one route because instead of the bridge we could fly over wine country and “break” at Napa Valley. Everybody wanted to go get pictures instead.... losers.


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Lawman

Well-Known Member
In the Tiger (Eurocopter From Goldeneye) they do put the primary pilot station up front with the gunner in back.
Do they ever have a sequencing issue with the ejection seat? Seat first, then the rotor? :stir:
Only active helicopter out here with an ejection seat is the Russian KA-50/52 series. And even then F all of that. There is legitimately 1 emergency condition where given the option of choose to eject over riding it down as a voting member of the “where my butt ends up” committee.


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I get it too, however that's weird.
I'm not sure whether that's an expression of the artist's self-image, or just what was cool then. For all I know, they were non-prescription.

When I was in the Army (mid-Vietnam era), military-issue eye glasses were a kind of translucent smoke gray. You could turn them into black frames by taking a Number 10 can, making up a concentrated solution of black RIT Dye (normally used to dye fabric) and boiling your glasses in it. Much cooler, and within the acceptance range of most military authorities. Created a kind of non-comforming comformity (and more acceptable than dyeing your boxer shorts pink!).

The other thing about military glasses: they were totally symmetrical. I was picking up a new prescription one time, and they just looked like the wrong Rx. I didn't say anything, took them off, and held the right lens side up to my left eye, and the left up to my right eye. Smiled at the optical tech, and handed the glasses to him. Neither of us said anything. He disappeared into the inner office, and returned a minute later with my glasses. Voila! I thanked him, and could see my way out of his office.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure whether that's an expression of the artist's self-image, or just what was cool then. For all I know, they were non-prescription.

When I was in the Army (mid-Vietnam era), military-issue eye glasses were a kind of translucent smoke gray. You could turn them into black frames by taking a Number 10 can, making up a concentrated solution of black RIT Dye (normally used to dye fabric) and boiling your glasses in it. Much cooler, and within the acceptance range of most military authorities. Created a kind of non-comforming comformity (and more acceptable than dyeing your boxer shorts pink!).

The other thing about military glasses: they were totally symmetrical. I was picking up a new prescription one time, and they just looked like the wrong Rx. I didn't say anything, took them off, and held the right lens side up to my left eye, and the left up to my right eye. Smiled at the optical tech, and handed the glasses to him. Neither of us said anything. He disappeared into the inner office, and returned a minute later with my glasses. Voila! I thanked him, and could see my way out of his office.
I think we were more just commenting on the odd direction they went with for what is supposed to be a memorial. It’s just such a severe departure from the sort of standard plaque/statue/poem type deal that it comes across almost too different.

It’s like we all know in general what a Tombstone should or more accurately typically looks like, but even if it’s Elton Johns... the flashing neon lights are a little grandious for what it’s supposed to be.
 
I've mostly run out of non food related things to do in the town of Narita, so today I walked an hour to the park that is at the arrival end of runway 16R. It was a little chilly and it was a bit of a wait, but I was treated to my coworkers bringing in the first 747 that I got to land into the airport where my aviation dreams were born.

N450PA
by Screaming Emu, on Flickr