CRJ550

BigZ

Well-Known Member
For all regional feed? I thought scope only applied to 76 seaters and up.
Nah, 255 aircraft between 51-76 seats, not to exceed 153 76-seat aircraft for the larger RJ. Or at least that's what wiki says. But the 50 seaters - up to 90% of the single aisle mainline fleet. Bringing new narrow bodies into the mainline (E195E2, A220, B797 etc) unlocks additional heavy RJ.
 

L-16B

Well-Known Member
In 2018 United had 96% total RJ to mainline narrowbody fleet. Hopefully they have a better ratio in their new contract. Unfortunately they have Kirby.
 
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BigZ

Well-Known Member
AA has a maximum number of regionals compared to our narrowbody fleet as well. Believe it’s 75% but don’t quote me.
Don't quote me either, but for AA 65 seat CRJ700 counts as a small RJ, while for UAL it would count the same as 76 seat 175. Hence AAG converted its 700s to 65 (some up from 63 seats, some down from 70 US Airways seats), and United is doing the CRJ550 thing.
I believe I read somewhere that either <50 or <=50 isn't limited, hence all the 140s brought back from the desert last summer.
 

L-16B

Well-Known Member
Don't quote me either, but for AA 65 seat CRJ700 counts as a small RJ, while for UAL it would count the same as 76 seat 175. Hence AAG converted its 700s to 65 (some up from 63 seats, some down from 70 US Airways seats), and United is doing the CRJ550 thing.
I believe I read somewhere that either <50 or <=50 isn't limited, hence all the 140s brought back from the desert last summer.
Let me look in the actual JCBA to see if it breaks it down better
 

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L-16B

Well-Known Member
Don't quote me either, but for AA 65 seat CRJ700 counts as a small RJ, while for UAL it would count the same as 76 seat 175. Hence AAG converted its 700s to 65 (some up from 63 seats, some down from 70 US Airways seats), and United is doing the CRJ550 thing.
I believe I read somewhere that either <50 or <=50 isn't limited, hence all the 140s brought back from the desert last summer.
66-76 seats is considered a large RJ and can’t be more than 40% of the narrow body fleet. All rj’s combined can’t be more than 75% of the total narrow body fleet.

I’ve never been on an AA RJ but if what you say is true then it’s a similar workaround. Definitely good to be educated about this stuff. Hopefully United can at least lower the total RJ ratio. Scope for all airlines would be better if it was max configured seats and not currently configured seats.
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
66-76 seats is considered a large RJ and can’t be more than 40% of the narrow body fleet. All rj’s combined can’t be more than 75% of the total narrow body fleet.

I’ve never been on an AA RJ but if what you say is true then it’s a similar workaround. Definitely good to be educated about this stuff. Hopefully United can at least lower the total RJ ratio. Scope for all airlines would be better if it was max configured seats and not currently configured seats.
Strategic planning in the long run doesn't see OEMs making the replacement 50 seaters. Pilot shortage and all that. Beancounter word is we will eventually see 76 seaters with less frequency on the 50 seater routes and mainline flying the 100+ seats where 76 used to be.
Fingers crossed.
 

learhawkerbe400

Well-Known Member
66-76 seats is considered a large RJ and can’t be more than 40% of the narrow body fleet. All rj’s combined can’t be more than 75% of the total narrow body fleet.

I’ve never been on an AA RJ but if what you say is true then it’s a similar workaround. Definitely good to be educated about this stuff. Hopefully United can at least lower the total RJ ratio. Scope for all airlines would be better if it was max configured seats and not currently configured seats.
Never been on AA RJ huh? You flew one for a year.
 
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