Crash in Bakersfield, CA

PhotoPilot

New Member
I heard about a student and instructor that went down in Bakersfield last night, but nobody had any details and I couldn't find anything to confirm the rumor.

Anyone have information?
 

JEP

Malko In Charge
Staff member
here you go, I posted the article becuase you have to register to get the whole articel..............................
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Plane crash leaves 2 dead

Officials investigate after pair from flight school killed near Rosamond

By HEATHER LAKE , Antelope Valley Press

Posted: Thursday December 4th, 2003, 10:45 PM
Last Updated: Thursday December 4th, 2003, 11:22 PM

ROSAMOND -- A retired Air Force colonel and a South Korean air force major died Thursday in the crash of a twin-engine Derringer aircraft from the National Test Pilot School in Mojave.
Both Ret. Col. Ronald Bradley, 59, of Lake Havasu, Ariz., and Maj. Cheongon Kim, 34, who lived in Lancaster, died in the crash, according to a Kern County coroner's report.

The pilots, apparently student and instructor, were from the National Test Pilot School, a flight school established more than 20 years ago.

The school is frequently used for training pilots from foreign military organizations.

Kim was training to be a test pilot and had been at the school for about four weeks, the sheriff's statement said.

The plane came down in the area of140th Street West and Avenue A near Rosamond, according to a sheriff's release.

Edwards Air Force Base alerted Kern County Sheriff's Department to the crash about 12:20 p.m. Thursday, said Deputy James Anton.

Federal Aviation Administration officials, representatives from the engine manufacturer and Kern County sheriff's deputies were still on scene Thursday night. An investigation team from the National Transportation Safety Board arrived on the scene late Thursday. NTSB investigator Wayne Pollack said the investigation was to begin immediately even in hours of darkness.

Kern coroner's officials removed the bodies from the crash site about 3 p.m., Anton estimated.

Sheriff's deputies were to be stationed throughout the night at the crash site until the investigation was complete to protect the plane, Anton said.

FAA officials were on scene in a "fact-finding" capacity. The NTSB conducted the investigation.

Investigators on scene kept photographers and reporters at a distance, more than 200 yards from the crash site.

Students from the school fly in everything from a Cessna 150 general aviation-type aircraft to the supersonic Draken, a Swedish-made fighter jet.

The Derringer, in earlier Valley Press accounts, is described as a "Flying Ferrari," aimed at the frequent business traveler market. It also was intended for training commercial airline pilots.

The Derringer was reported missing about 12:20 p.m. when the Edwards Air Force Base Tower reported to the Kern County Sheriff's Department that it lost contact with the plane on its radar. The test pilot school then reported that it had a plane overdue.

The plane was initially spotted circling in the area of Holiday Street south of Rosamond Boulevard, but when Kern deputies arrived on the scene they found the wreckage and bodies of the pilot and instructor.

Neither a representative from the National Test Pilot School nor Edwards Air Force Base could be reached for comment late Thursday.

The National Test Pilot School is one of two test pilot schools in southeastern Kern County -- the other is the world's premier test flight facility, the Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards.

Founded in 1981, the National Test Pilot School has taught more than 3,000 students in courses ranging from a two-week introductory course to a yearlong master's program. In late 2001, the school had 16 full-time instructors, mostly retired military test pilots and engineers.

Students at the school come to the Mojave operation with at least a commercial pilot's license, which involves 750 to 1,000 hours of flight time, according to previous Valley Press accounts.

Students in the school's yearlong course -- which costs about $650,000 for a pilot -- come from all over the world, representing both foreign military and industry.

Because of the price, most students are enrolled with governmental or company sponsorship.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
[ QUOTE ]
Students in the school's yearlong course -- which costs about $650,000 for a pilot -- come from all over the world, representing both foreign military and industry.

[/ QUOTE ]

Damn.
 

tonyw

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Students at the school come to the Mojave operation with at least a commercial pilot's license, which involves 750 to 1,000 hours of flight time, according to previous Valley Press accounts.

[/ QUOTE ]

I guess I'll never get that commercial.



Where do they get this kind of stuff?

[ QUOTE ]
Students in the school's yearlong course -- which costs about $650,000 for a pilot -- come from all over the world, representing both foreign military and industry.

[/ QUOTE ]

And you folks from Riddle were complaining about your high tuition costs?

 
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