Conquest Air Crash near Miami (Ditching)

CK

Well-Known Member
I can't think of any reason not fuel related that would shut down two 2800s. Like @CFI A&P said this was a regular flight for the aircraft and crew, it'll be interesting to hear what the SIC has to say.
Here is an interesting L1011 incident between the same city pairs:

Eastern Air Lines Flight 855 - Wikipedia

En route back to Miami, low oil pressure lights for engines #1 and #3 illuminated, and the oil quantity gauges for all three engines read zero.At 09:23, Flight 855 informed Miami ARTCC of the engine gauge readings but stated, "We believe it to be faulty indications since the chance of all three engines having zero oil pressure and zero quantity is almost nil." At 09:28, at an altitude of 16,000 feet (4,877 m), the #3 engine failed. Five minutes later, the #1 engine flamed out while the crew was attempting to restart the #2 engine. Cabin lights went off and flight deck instruments stopped working. The aircraft descended without power from about 13,000 feet (3,962 m) to about 4,000 feet (1,219 m), at a rate of descent of approximately 1,600 feet (488 m) per minute.The crew successfully restarted the #2 engine on the third attempt and executed a one-engine landing at Miami at 09:46. After the landing the power from #2 engine was insufficient for the aircraft to taxi; a tug had to be used to tow it to the airport terminal, where the occupants disembarked normally. None of the 172 passengers and crew aboard were injured in the incident.

Alex.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
Here is an interesting L1011 incident between the same city pairs:

Eastern Air Lines Flight 855 - Wikipedia




Alex.
I'd never heard that story, but it's an excellent example of why ETOPS MX procedures would never allow one mechanic to service both engines, not that ETOPS would have been required in either situation. I worked for a DOM that insisted that no matter what engine work was done, other than just servicing the oil, leak checks were to be conducted at idle and full power. It was a pain in the ass because it required us to taxi to a blast fence area, but it let the oil warm up and more thorough leak check was the result. As long as he wasn't complaining about how long a job was taking I didn't mind.
 

melax

Well-Known Member
"between 10 seconds and two minutes, the left engine backfired"

which one is it ? I would know for sure the difference between 10 sec and 2 min if it happened to me (I remember every detail of my engine out occurrence, it scared teh sh**t out of me).
That sound like lawyer answer to me unless I'm missing something in comprehension.
They left allegedly with 900 Gallons, That's about 5hrs for that aircraft I doubt that the excess fuel burn can account for the discrepancy. The final report will shed some light.
 

Autothrust Blue

"...I know bait when I see it..."
Corporate Dude Video: “...Delta wanted to hire me, but this is too cooolllll....”
You know, I’d really rather fly a Convair, myself, if there was a choice. Love the Bus though I do, but props and straight wings are just fun.

Though ... the money, and the whole “almost certainly coming home alive” thing is very, very nice as well.
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
You know, I’d really rather fly a Convair, myself, if there was a choice. Love the Bus though I do, but props and straight wings are just fun.

Though ... the money, and the whole “almost certainly coming home alive” thing is very, very nice as well.
"Hey, what did you guys do you're multi time building in?" "Instructed in a clapped out Apaches, Dutchess and Seminoles. You?" "Clapped out Convair."

"I'm a professional buffalo wing critic myself"

"I make artisanal chocolates!"

Our budget is $1.5 million.
Now that sounds like an episode of international house hunters.
 

Autothrust Blue

"...I know bait when I see it..."
This is the new normal. Retired Airline Pilots in their declining years, flying beyond their ability and new guys desperately trying to reach their 1500 hours. Along with the 7+ checkride failers, this is non-airline aviation now.
My old man (whose retirement job is going to involve radial engines; from whence he came, back to where he really wants to be) will still fly circles around you, even in his declining years.

That said, this accident does have South Florida non-sked written all over it.
 

NickH

Dank Meme
My old man (whose retirement job is going to involve radial engines; from whence he came, back to where he really wants to be) will still fly circles around you, even in his declining years.

That said, this accident does have South Florida non-sked written all over it.
Easily possible, until he doesn't.
 

Autothrust Blue

"...I know bait when I see it..."
Easily possible, until he doesn't.
I do think cognitive degradation beyond about 65 is worth looking into, don't get me wrong; the average age of his retired coworkers is also something like 67 or 68 and perhaps that's also noteworthy.
 

NickH

Dank Meme
I do think cognitive degradation beyond about 65 is worth looking into, don't get me wrong; the average age of his retired coworkers is also something like 67 or 68 and perhaps that's also noteworthy.
Cognitive degradation starts before 30. But experience has value. There's a point, which is different for everyone, where impaired cognition overwhelms experience, and ability starts to decline. The speed of that decline is also variable. The point is, we need to embrace our own mortality, and realise that there are things we won't be able to do forever. Self evaluation is important, especially as we age. I'm sure there are capable pilots over 60, although I've never met any personally. There are many pilots who choose to work in to their 60s and 70s who are in denial about their ability to continue, and are putting lives at risk in doing so. The present climate means that less reputable companies are unwilling to pay a market wage for a competent pilot, and are exploiting pilots who want to work beyond their ability to do so.
 

Crop Duster

E pluribus unum
I do think cognitive degradation beyond about 65 is worth looking into, don't get me wrong; the average age of his retired coworkers is also something like 67 or 68 and perhaps that's also noteworthy.
As with any bio/medical condition, cognitive ability should be assessed per individual.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
This makes me sad.
It's something we need to keep in mind when we plan retirement. While you'll be able to fly to 65, please don't be one of those people that goes 135 after. I've never met one of them that should be allowed to do so.
 
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