Conquest Air Crash near Miami (Ditching)

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
Where do these flaky south FL operators flying old junk find pilots these days? I’m truly amazed any of them are around anymore.
Even without GPS, it is only a couple of airways and 3 VOR's between the two airports. They don't need RVSM, RNP, de-cice/ anti-ice or any other special equipment. Un-pressurized airplanes seem perfect for these 160nm daily freight runs.
 

ahw01

Well-Known Member
Even without GPS, it is only a couple of airways and 3 VOR's between the two airports. They don't need RVSM, RNP, de-cice/ anti-ice or any other special equipment. Un-pressurized airplanes seem perfect for these 160nm daily freight runs.
Flew Naples to Marsh Harbour, Stella Maris, Tamiami, Key West a few years back in a C-172. Mainly at 5500-6500. Can be done.
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
Where do these flaky south FL operators flying old junk find pilots these days? I’m truly amazed any of them are around anymore.
Couple of years ago I was looking for a job after a CJ2+ was sold from under my butt.
Options were Phenom 300 charter and DC-3 island cargo. Actually thought long and hard about it, because DC-3 with radials and decent operation. Went with Phenoms for career progression and all that, but DC-3s would be immensely awesome.
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
Plane was 64, pilot was 71. Probably learned to fly it in nursery school.

The old stuff, and old people, fly just fine. Until something goes wrong that neither can cope with. True of hardware and people at any age.
I mean, he managed a ditching...

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CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
A wing has washed ashore about 100 miles north of where they ditched. Is is not for the PA32 that ditched a week prior that was on the way to the Bahamas, as this piece is larger than a Cherokee 6.

 

gliderboy

Well-Known Member
They were almost back to the barn when they ditched so.... maybe ran it outta gas. Or, if mis-fueled, perhaps the gas/Jet-A ratio in the tanks was just enough to keep her going for a while 'til all the plugs fouled.
Since so many Convairs are now turbines, you'd think they supervise all fueling operations on the radials.... Or, perhaps it was just, "We should be okay on gas."
If so, it's very upsetting to see faithful, hard-working old airplanes destroyed through carelessness.
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
They were almost back to the barn when they ditched so.... maybe ran it outta gas. Or, if mis-fueled, perhaps the gas/Jet-A ratio in the tanks was just enough to keep her going for a while 'til all the plugs fouled.
Since so many Convairs are now turbines, you'd think they supervise all fueling operations on the radials.... Or, perhaps it was just, "We should be okay on gas."
If so, it's very upsetting to see faithful, hard-working old airplanes destroyed through carelessness.
This aircraft made daily runs from Miami to Nassau to Miami. Misfueling would be unlikely, given the consistency of the operation and the aircraft only has one tank per wing, So contamination or servicing with wrong fuel would have been discovered immediately.

Since I don’t work for, nor have I ever worked for that company I don’t know their particular procedure but usually it goes something like “__ fuel required, __ fuel on board.” But hey, it is S Florida so maybe they were so relaxed that they didn’t review fuel requirements.

The good news is that the survivor was the SIC, and has an SIC type rating, which will help out with the investigation.

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knot4u

Repeat Offender
I can't think of any reason not fuel related that would shut down two 2800s. Like @CFI A&P said this was a regular flight for the aircraft and crew, it'll be interesting to hear what the SIC has to say.
 
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