CONCORD Final FLIGHT

Mandla

New Member
Yesterday I was at Bristol's Filton Airport (England) to witness Concord in its final flight and final landing. All I can say is it was the most spectacular, emotional and truly memorable event in the history of aviation. For those who would be interested in seeing some pictures I took Iam going to try and post them onto the forum. I just need a little help though, iam not very good at computers and stuff. If anyone knows how I can post the pictures please lemme know, Ive got some fantastic pictures of the bird in its final moments.

ZuLu
 

averyrm

Well-Known Member
I saw it there on Wednesday. I marched in the Macy's Thanksgiving Parade (we were the santa band) and we had a practice on the deck of the Intrepid. Neat stuff.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Pretty sad.

It more or less marks the last time commercial aviation made any type of advance towards someting 'great' as opposed to something that simply pleases the accountants.
 

cointyro

New Member
Hey, watch it there on the accountant bashing!

The plane, admittedly, was SWEET.

But the billions in cost it imposed on taxpayers was an atrocious thing... even though I'm not a huge socialist kinda guy, this would have been far better spent on shoring up honestly-intended Social Security and Medicare-type programs in Britain and France.

IMHO. Government funding of space and aeronautics programs should be very very minimal - if we really care about the seriously poor in this country, let's take care of them first before we pay $30k a pound to loft astronauts into the heavens - OR use govt subsidies to create admittedly-sweet but rarely-economical new "big boy's toys".
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
True. European aviation does seem to amount to a big 'jobs program'...

However, since Boeing announced that they're going to manufacture a lot of the 7E7's parts overseas, I'm less opposed to US carriers purchasing Airbus products. Bah.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
I wonder just how much of the 7E7 will be designed, or manufactured at the Boeing Design Centre over in Russia.......


[/ QUOTE ]

No clue.

Multi-nationalism is hunky dory as long as it doesn't represent a net loss in American jobs for an American project.
 

Prospective_Pilot

New Member
Makes sense having it built in other countries where they can pay people 40% less....just not cool for those people, or American's that loose their job because of it...
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
I always assume that the American's not building it for a decent wage aren't in the economy purchasing goods and services and especially not airline tickets which affects us all.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Nah, considering most people that participate in the US economy don't have long term roots here... s'ok bro!

Unless, of course, you're Native American/Indigenous...
 

I_Money

Moderator
[ QUOTE ]
However, since Boeing announced that they're going to manufacture a lot of the 7E7's parts overseas, I'm less opposed to US carriers purchasing Airbus products. Bah.

[/ QUOTE ]

I never thought I would hear that.

I am not too opposed to the concorde being built on tax payers money - it really made the way for Airbus to get going, which has probably paid of in jobs.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]


Where do u fly tomorrow??

[/ QUOTE ]

Nowhere! I'm off tomorrow.

Probably do dishes, buy some socks, do some laundry and pack up for another five days. Ack!
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]

I never thought I would hear that.


[/ QUOTE ]

Me either. I think Boeing builds a far superior product, even though I feel they dropped the ball on the 737-600/700/800 with leaving out some of the biggest concerns that we have as pilots as the ability to stand up and stretch, cockpit noise and finally getting around to fixing the abhorrent nose section (small and extraordinarily noisy at high speed cruise), but they represented an American company building American jets.

Since they decided to build more of the jet outside of the US, the big "Dougie-bonus" of supporting the average US worker is no longer a factor, might as well buy whatever jet suits the accountants.

No, I'm not communist (as some other webmasters alluded to), I just believe that unless it benefits the common US worker, I don't believe it's a net positive.
 

I_Money

Moderator
I have a friend who flew the 757/767 for many years, and recently switched the Airbus and thinks it is a great ship. He pushes his seat back, crosses his right leg over his left, and uses his shoe to press the PTT switch when he is PNF.
 

cointyro

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I wonder just how much of the 7E7 will be designed, or manufactured at the Boeing Design Centre over in Russia

[/ QUOTE ]

Here is a diagram of the 7E7 workshare:



Some details on the assembly of the plane:

EVERETT, Wash., Nov. 20, 2003 -- Boeing [NYSE:BA] today announced work share arrangements for the team that will be responsible for major structural sections of its proposed 7E7 Dreamliner airplane.

The structures team partners, named earlier this year, will build large sections of the airplane at sites in the United States, Japan, Italy, Australia and Canada, then transport those parts to the 7E7 final assembly location, which will be in the United States.

Boeing will provide major structure to the program through work at its facilities in Frederickson, Wash.; Tulsa, Okla.; Wichita, Kan.; Winnipeg, Canada; and Hawker de Havilland in Australia. Other work packages have been assigned to Japan's Fuji Heavy Industries (FHI), Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI); Vought Aircraft Industries of Dallas, Texas; and Italy's Alenia Aeronautica.

"The process of assigning work packages has been very thorough and deliberate," said Mike Bair, senior vice president of the 7E7 program. "We looked at the capabilities and capacities of each structures team partner and assigned work where it would be done efficiently and effectively, creating a great product for our customers and solid business cases for everyone involved."

Boeing will supply approximately 35 percent of the 7E7 structure including the vertical fin from Frederickson, the fixed and movable leading edges of the wing from Tulsa, the flight deck and part of the forward fuselage section from Wichita, the movable trailing edges from Australia and the wing-to-body fairing from Winnipeg.

MHI will be responsible for the wing box. KHI will provide the remaining part of the forward fuselage, the main landing gear wheel well and the main wing fixed trailing edge. FHI is focused on the center wing box and integration of the center wing box with the main landing gear wheel well. The total work share of the 7E7 structure for Japan is approximately 35 percent.

Vought and Alenia are teaming on their work packages, with details of where they will build different elements expected at a later date. Together, they will build the 7E7 horizontal stabilizer and the center and aft fuselage. The Vought/Alenia work statement accounts for approximately 26 percent of the 7E7 structure.

Discussions regarding the placement of the remaining structures work are ongoing. This work accounts for approximately 4 percent of the 7E7 structure.

"This is a great team of proven performers," said Bair. "I look forward to our ongoing cooperation as we move forward with the 7E7. These decisions take us one step closer to our Authority to Offer review with our board of directors."

Boeing today confirmed that the 7E7 program headquarters and development and design integration center will be in Everett, Wash.

Boeing announced earlier this year that final assembly will be in the United States and is continuing with the process of evaluating proposals received by potential final assembly locations.

The company expects to make decisions regarding the placement of 7E7 systems and other work throughout 2004. A decision regarding which engine or engines will be offered on the airplane is expected in mid-2004.

"Creating a new airplane is a tremendous undertaking," said Bair. "We have worked diligently with our partners and our Boeing sites to find the answers that will ensure the success of the program."


###
 

cointyro

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
No, I'm not communist (as some other webmasters alluded to), I just believe that unless it benefits the common US worker, I don't believe it's a net positive.

[/ QUOTE ]

Actually, I'm more of a "unless it benefits the US worker named Dan Olin born in 1981 in Yuma, AZ, I don't believe it's a positive" kinda guy.
 

IT_Pilot

New Member
Boeing gave away the wing? Am I reading that right? WTF?

Is that normal, at face value it seems like giving away the family silver.
 
Top