Commuters Input Please

nyk

Well-Known Member
#21
I'm just tired of moving for a company. I've had a lot of bad luck in this field and I refuse to move anymore and saw this as an option. Maybe it wont be anymore and I will have to reconsider the job. Again I'm just sick of moving, Period! If I'm going to move I want a comparable pay for my experience and at the right time. That being said please keep the bashing at a minimum as I didn't ask to be critiqued, I asked for advice. Thanks again to all that brought some insight in commuting.
 

Flagship_dxer

Legacy Airline Dispatcher
#22
I'm just tired of moving for a company. I've had a lot of bad luck in this field and I refuse to move anymore and saw this as an option. Maybe it wont be anymore and I will have to reconsider the job. Again I'm just sick of moving, Period! If I'm going to move I want a comparable pay for my experience and at the right time. That being said please keep the bashing at a minimum as I didn't ask to be critiqued, I asked for advice. Thanks again to all that brought some insight in commuting.
Maybe this isnt the career or calling for you in life. It takes a flexible and stubborn personality to make it in this business. You have to be willing to make certain sacrifices and trade offs. You can always teach dispatch but if that isnt for you then you need to think of a career change.
 

nyk

Well-Known Member
#23
Maybe this isnt the career or calling for you in life. It takes a flexible and stubborn personality to make it in this business. You have to be willing to make certain sacrifices and trade offs. You can always teach dispatch but if that isnt for you then you need to think of a career change.
HAHA I know what I'm doing this is just something that will pay the bills until I finish my Masters. I'm not some young buck I've been in dispatching field for almost five years and over 30 years old. Teaching was working out great but the college cancelled the dispatch program so now I'm just looking for something in-between. :fury:
 

womanpilot73

Well-Known Member
#24
nyk said:
HAHA I know what I'm doing this is just something that will pay the bills until I finish my Masters. I'm not some young buck I've been in dispatching field for almost five years and over 30 years old. Teaching was working out great but the college cancelled the dispatch program so now I'm just looking for something in-between. :fury:
Hey, Jeppesen is often looking for contract instructors. Have you thought about them? Though you'd have to move for that as there are no flight benefits.
 

Flagship_dxer

Legacy Airline Dispatcher
#25
HAHA I know what I'm doing this is just something that will pay the bills until I finish my Masters. I'm not some young buck I've been in dispatching field for almost five years and over 30 years old. Teaching was working out great but the college cancelled the dispatch program so now I'm just looking for something in-between. :fury:
Have you thought about SkyLease. They are hiring in GSO. http://www.skyleasecargo.com/assets/downloads/dispatch-job-posting.pdf

Pay is not great but its good international dispatching experience.
 

bushpilot87

Well-Known Member
#26
this whole daily commute is contingent on the fact that you get a shift that is commutable on both ends.. that is highly unlikely. Therefore, its not a viable option.
 

nyk

Well-Known Member
#28
Have you thought about SkyLease. They are hiring in GSO. http://www.skyleasecargo.com/assets/downloads/dispatch-job-posting.pdf

Pay is not great but its good international dispatching experience.
I already did a stint with them a few years ago and there dispatch is now in MIA at the Centurion building. Plus they dont pay their employees on time which is why I left to begin with. I think I might suck it up and look at some 135 operators locally. Thanks though.
 

LX Sport

Well-Known Member
#29
I'm agree with mannix. It'll be a life lesson. Try it since you think it's a manageable daily commute. More than likely, you'll realize it's not a good idea after a bit. But the benefit of trying it out is it'll kick your butt into moving as fast as you possibly can. Good motivation for a move. So yes, give it a shot.
Worst case...he could get fired for missing a shift...or being late to shifts...all during probation. Seems risky.
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
#30
Worst case...he could get fired for missing a shift...or being late to shifts...all during probation. Seems risky.
I agree, and it's certainly not something I'd tell a hiring manager I was planning on doing during an interview.

Personally, I've moved a bunch of times over the years for dispatch jobs...just goes with the territory. While there are a lot of positives to being a dispatcher, getting to pick where you live really isn't one of them. There is no way I would ever try commuting, even if it was only on a weekly basis...I have co-workers who do, and it sure doesn't look like any fun to me.
 

womanpilot73

Well-Known Member
#31
manniax said:
There is no way I would ever try commuting, even if it was only on a weekly basis...
Agreed. That is not a way I would ever choose to spend my off time. QOL is way too important to me.

It was worth the debt to move in the long run for me. If you have a goal and this move is helping you towards achieving that goal, it's worth it. If not, you may reconsider interviewing for the job at all.
 

Pilot121

Well-Known Member
#32
I'm just curious, what makes pilot commuting different than dispatcher commuting? Do dispatchers not get as high of a standby priority or something?
 

mrezee

Living the dream!
#33
I'm just curious, what makes pilot commuting different than dispatcher commuting? Do dispatchers not get as high of a standby priority or something?
It all depends on who you're working for and what metal you're commuting on. Pilots have a "commuter clause" in their union contract that basically says they won't get in trouble if they miss a trip assignment as long as they can prove they tried to make a certain number of flights to base and got bumped off. We have a commuter clause for dispatchers in our union contract as well, but not all do.

In addition, pilots will always bump dispatchers on their own metal for the jumpseat, at least at 9E. I think AA is the same too, though I'm not positive. Mainline AA and DL pilots can reserve the jumpseat as well if commuting. I'm not sure if dispatchers can (I heard they could at DL?).

OP, I would strongly suggest moving. It isn't worth the stress trying to commute, especially if you don't have a commuter clause. You basically live two lives and have two homes. While pilots start their trip and stay in hotels on their trips, you'll be coming right back to the crash pad every night. I live 8 minutes away from my work, and the only stress I have about my commute is that my alarm is going to go off on time at 2am and I won't sleep through it.
 

Flagship_dxer

Legacy Airline Dispatcher
#34
I'm just curious, what makes pilot commuting different than dispatcher commuting? Do dispatchers not get as high of a standby priority or something?
It really isnt that much different. Most pilots probably wouldnt commute if their domiciles did not change so often. Commuting is a challenge for them too and many wish they didnt have to commute. Even for pilots who can reserve the jumpseat, you still are at the mercy of delays, cancellations and weight restrictions.
 
#35
It all depends on who you're working for and what metal you're commuting on. Pilots have a "commuter clause" in their union contract that basically says they won't get in trouble if they miss a trip assignment as long as they can prove they tried to make a certain number of flights to base and got bumped off. We have a commuter clause for dispatchers in our union contract as well, but not all do.

In addition, pilots will always bump dispatchers on their own metal for the jumpseat, at least at 9E. I think AA is the same too, though I'm not positive. Mainline AA and DL pilots can reserve the jumpseat as well if commuting. I'm not sure if dispatchers can (I heard they could at DL?).

OP, I would strongly suggest moving. It isn't worth the stress trying to commute, especially if you don't have a commuter clause. You basically live two lives and have two homes. While pilots start their trip and stay in hotels on their trips, you'll be coming right back to the crash pad every night. I live 8 minutes away from my work, and the only stress I have about my commute is that my alarm is going to go off on time at 2am and I won't sleep through it.
You can reserve at DL. Commuters get first pick and if it is still open, you can reserve it for leisure on a first-come basis.
 

BayouMLU

Well-Known Member
#36
Commuting blows. Commuting daily is just asking for your co-workers to hate you when you show up late and tired all the time and at worst, a way to quickly get fired.

I recommend not moving. Sell it all and then find a new place to live close to work.
 

F9DXER

Well-Known Member
#37
Commuting blows. Commuting daily is just asking for your co-workers to hate you when you show up late.
If said commuter brings donuts, it's all good!!

Yes at times commuting does suck. Of course if one's significant other is PO'd at you - saying you have to head to the airport can be a good thing.

Legal disclaimer - I can neither deny nor confirm that any of that has happened in my life.
 

Blackhawk

Well-Known Member
#40
I commute. It is what it is. Much depends on where you want to commute to. Any commute to/from ATL is normally hard. When I go there for AQP I normally have to give myself 3 flights, then wind up on the jump seat.
Maybe see if you can get a crash pad there, then commute a few times a week or so instead of daily.
 
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