Commutair landing incident

Boris Badenov

He comes to save the day in a broken truck.
Hell, I'd say at 3400 and some TPIC I'm still in the "getting the hang of this" category.
Closing in on 10k, few grand TPIC, learning every day what a dipstick I used to be. I'd estimate that at 250 hours I would have been an Active Threat In A Jet. At 1500 I might just maybe have been able to unscrew myself enough to learn something. Now, one might retort that I'm an unusually stupid or incompetent pilot, and one might even be right (ask anyone who has flown with me). But 50% of us are below average, and that's kind of the point.
 

JordanD

Honorary Member
Closing in on 10k, few grand TPIC, learning every day what a dipstick I used to be. I'd estimate that at 250 hours I would have been an Active Threat In A Jet. At 1500 I might just maybe have been able to unscrew myself enough to learn something. Now, one might retort that I'm an unusually stupid or incompetent pilot, and one might even be right (ask anyone who has flown with me). But 50% of us are below average, and that's kind of the point.
Oh yeah. Upgrading has been and still is one of the most challenging things I've ever done. For every "it's good to be king" day there's a "I wish I could take one of these stripes off and not have to deal with this crap." days. Plenty of days where you wonder "I hope I made the right decisions" and I know at this point that'll probably never go away until I retire.
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
Oh yeah. Upgrading has been and still is one of the most challenging things I've ever done. For every "it's good to be king" day there's a "I wish I could take one of these stripes off and not have to deal with this crap." days. Plenty of days where you wonder "I hope I made the right decisions" and I know at this point that'll probably never go away until I retire.
A lot of what you're dealing with has to do with working at a regional. Mainline captains don't deal with half the crap you do.
 

JordanD

Honorary Member
A lot of what you're dealing with has to do with working at a regional. Mainline captains don't deal with half the crap you do.
Yeah, the more I learn how much on my own I am for half the pay the more burnt out and helpless I start feeling. Sat in the UA jumpseat and watched them coordinate new altitudes and headwinds to make up for a departure delay and it actually worked like magic. Meanwhile... “hey, you didn’t give us an alternate...and we pretty clearly need one.” Or not getting any hold fuel going into LGA with 400 ft OVC. It gets old doing multiple peoples jobs.
 

broncoav8r

Well-Known Member
A lot of what you're dealing with has to do with working at a regional. Mainline captains don't deal with half the crap you do.
98% True. Exception: “oh I came over 6 months ago after 20 years on the triple so I could be a captain when I retire in 8 months...” . Then it’s same crap, without the stripes to effectively deal with it.
 

PeanuckleCRJ

Poodle Wrangler
A lot of what you're dealing with has to do with working at a regional. Mainline captains don't deal with half the crap you do.
I cannot speak enough to the truth of this. Upgrading at SJI, while at times does have it's "time to deal with stupid captain stuff," is the best job I've ever had by many magnitudes.

Meanwhile I always say being a CA at pinnacle taught me how to say no.
 

PeanuckleCRJ

Poodle Wrangler
98% True. Exception: “oh I came over 6 months ago after 20 years on the triple so I could be a captain when I retire in 8 months...” . Then it’s same crap, without the stripes to effectively deal with it.
And that example is why it's so much nicer as CA at mainline, haha. No more of sitting next to that watching them stare and poke at the FMS like my toddler fiddling with the TV remote unlocking modes neither of us knew existed.
 

Ajax

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
I hear that being a captain is a challenge, unfortunately I've never had the opportunity to do it. I love a good challenge, looking back at my relatively short career the big hurdles were the most fun to do. The more I learn, the more I realize how little I knew in the first place.
 

TWP

Well-Known Member
Yeah, the more I learn how much on my own I am for half the pay the more burnt out and helpless I start feeling. Sat in the UA jumpseat and watched them coordinate new altitudes and headwinds to make up for a departure delay and it actually worked like magic. Meanwhile... “hey, you didn’t give us an alternate...and we pretty clearly need one.” Or not getting any hold fuel going into LGA with 400 ft OVC. It gets old doing multiple peoples jobs.
You know, this is why I don’t sweat anything other than go home leg.....and I don’t even sweat that. I’m efficient safe and quick. The only reason the flight doesn’t go on time is if somebody else in the chain is slow and that’s fine. I need the numbers to be correct and everyone involved to know exactly what’s going on.

I don’t delay flights on purpose like some, but I also don’t sweat it when I call dispatch and it takes forever to resolve the issue. My stress tanks are empty and I don’t plan on refueling them ever again over this job.

Being in the left seat really makes you realize that the only reason you ever had a bad day as an FO was because the guy in the left seat was stressing too much. Guys getting pissed over a diversion on day 3 of 5..... who cares? Maybe they had a girlfriend at the original overnight, who knows.

The captain at a regional is the de facto parent of every other person working there, from dispatch to push crew. Some days I go the extra mile, put on the little kid gloves and help them along. Other days I let go of the bike and see how far they can get without the training wheels. But I’m definitely out of stress energy, and I’m loving the left seat.

Now when it comes to scheduling, that’s a different story. Maybe that’s where all my stress goes....the poor guy on the other end of the phone when they screwed up yet again.
 

jtsastre

Well-Known Member
Being in the left seat really makes you realize that the only reason you ever had a bad day as an FO was because the guy in the left seat was stressing too much. Guys getting pissed over a diversion on day 3 of 5..... who cares? Maybe they had a girlfriend at the original overnight, who knows.
This right here. I have the same anti-stress attitude now as a CA, but when I was an FO, some of those stressed out captains made the trip that much more unbearable, all for naught.
 
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