Comfy in IMC

TWP

Well-Known Member
#63
CFII.

It’s a nice validation from an outside source that shows you know your stuff enough to be trusted with a student.

Aside from that, set some personal minimums that are way above ifr, and fly a lot. Slowly lower those personal minimums over time.

*a note

If you’re ever ifr and find yourself in situation where you aren’t sure what’s going on, please tell atc. They are more than happy to help you. Fessing up and saying “hey man I’m turned around and need some help” means everyone gets to go home happy later.
 
#64
Great idea, but I can't hardly find a CFII around here to fly under the hood, much less one that'll file actual. 45 minute drive one direction for instrument instruction, 1 1/2 hours the other, and last time I tried to book it was 3 weeks to get onto the schedule.
Shoot me a PM. You’re in the Wisconsin area right?
 
#65
I’m probably one of the least knowledgeable people here, seeing as I’m still in fight school and at around 220 hours, but for what it’s worth... learning to fly in the Pacific Northwest and having instructors who let me file through/request altitudes to intentionally put me in the clouds has been great. Personally I feel like I learn much better than when trying to simulate it, and it’s a great confidence booster.

There are plenty of things that still make me uncomfortable, but actual IMC is no longer one of them. Not feeling complacent, just saying that it doesn’t put me on edge. I love getting the chance to fly approaches in IMC.

Don’t know how low time you actually are... just a perspective from someone else who’s only a few pages into the logbook.
 

Stryker172

Well-Known Member
#66
I did a two hour cross country flight in IMC most of the way about a week after my checkride. I felt confident in my abilities, did a GPS approach and then an ILS coming back. In hindsight I was probably a little too confident given my experience level at the time having had a total of 1 hour of actual.

Did just fine though. Go out there, be safe but brave enough to step outside your comfort zone.
 

Kingairer

'Tiger Team' Member
#67
Great idea, but I can't hardly find a CFII around here to fly under the hood, much less one that'll file actual. 45 minute drive one direction for instrument instruction, 1 1/2 hours the other, and last time I tried to book it was 3 weeks to get onto the schedule.
You’ll pick up your CFII when you get back to the ship, and if you don’t, give me a call. I’ll fly with you.
 

milleR

Well-Known Member
#69
Equipment has a lot to do with it imo. After several thousand hours flying piston twins and turboprops in the NE year round I didn't give hand flying 200 and 1/2 a second thought. But as soon as I got back into a piston single that comfort went right out the window. I think I burned out the screen on my EDM staring at the thing so hard. Feel free to call me a nancy, but these days I'm not going anywhere with my family in the back that's reporting at minimums in something that either has less than two engines or doesn't burn Jet-A.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
#71
Equipment has a lot to do with it imo. After several thousand hours flying piston twins and turboprops in the NE year round I didn't give hand flying 200 and 1/2 a second thought. But as soon as I got back into a piston single that comfort went right out the window. I think I burned out the screen on my EDM staring at the thing so hard. Feel free to call me a nancy, but these days I'm not going anywhere with my family in the back that's reporting at minimums in something that either has less than two engines or doesn't burn Jet-A.
I was a little surprised i had the dreaded attitude indicator failure imc in an old 172 and had to shoot ALB to mins on the south runway and going back to that from a 1900 was still fine because everything was slower. Laughed at myself twice for going goofy on the ILS because i glanced at the bad indicator. Thankfully I wasn't hot on the Mike when I said"no stupid not that way" talking myself through the approach. Would have been good comedy.
 

bucksmith

Did you lock the doors?
#73
Every time a runway appears at the end of an approach I can’t help but have a “I can’t believe this all works!”

I’m glad there are smart people to design and develop all this stuff.
My thoughts exactly anytime I break out anywhere near mins, especially at night. Ain’t this stuff cool?


Never? There's a lot of things that can go wrong in singles IMC. I don't think there has ever been a time where I didn't think I could be more proficient, have a better equipped airplane, or the weather be better.

I would say I felt "comfortable" after taking the CFI-I ride and teaching the stuff for a while.
Now a days, I don’t think I’d launch into less that 1000’ and 3 in a 4 cylinder single engine ship. I don’t even want to fly a single at night anymore, really. Now if @killbilly puts a ribeye at another airport somewhere, I might have to put on my big boy pants.

Personally, I still get a little scared in snow and ice with strong winds and plowing operations in effect. I think of it like my carrier landing at night, ([knowledge of which I have gained thru diligent documentary viewing] Cue cool wx stories from some of my favorite JC’ers)
Anybody who says they’re not a little scared is either lying or crazy. It’s nice I don’t it very often, but that’s probably also why it still makes me grow an inch in my seat.
Good times!
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
#74
Now a days, I don’t think I’d launch into less that 1000’ and 3 in a 4 cylinder single engine ship. I don’t even want to fly a single at night anymore, really. Now if @killbilly puts a ribeye at another airport somewhere, I might have to put on my big boy pants.
!
If weather and schedules don't have some kind of marvelous coalescence in the next couple of weeks, we ain't goin' anywhere....
 

Autothrust Blue

Ultra-low-cost member
#75
No, everyone has their own minimums.

That and I’m not making a $100 burger run to an airport that’s got a 200’ ceiling.
The ticket means you need to have - and maintain - the skill to go to your lowest authorized minimums.

Otherwise, fork it over.

It does not necessarily follow that you always should go to the lowest authorized, but your skill level shouldn’t be the determining factor if you are appropriately rated and equipped.

Note: I observe a similar precaution for single engine IFR departures, and do not depart in less than 800-2 in Camarillo, where I am from, and 1000-3 everywhere else. Taking off is optional. Landing is certain.
 
#78
The ticket means you need to have - and maintain - the skill to go to your lowest authorized minimums.

Otherwise, fork it over.

It does not necessarily follow that you always should go to the lowest authorized, but your skill level shouldn’t be the determining factor if you are appropriately rated and equipped.
Really? Well, allllllriiiighty then.

I've got my commercial ticket and I just passed my instrument ride yesterday. C'mon meow! Hire Me!!! I've got "the skill to go to my authorized minimums". ;)
 
#79
This is the big Bogyman in the room that no one in flying talks/writes about. Single pilot, IMC, hand flying with pax in the back can be absolutely terrifying for the newbie (ask me how I know).
.
OMG, yes! @bassakwards. ... ... And this^^, more likely than not, will be your first paid job in aviation (I suppose sometimes not now, in our current era of entitled employment opps). But still, Ain't aviation grand??

And ain't aviation bass akwards? If we did things correctly, we'd start with easy and work toward hard. You know, everyone would do their primary training in jets and have to work their way up to non-automated, multi-engine-piston, single-pilot ops.
 
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86BravoPapa

Well-Known Member
#80
I've read a lot of posts from 121 pilots that say ifr/instruments are the toughest part of training at the airlines and what washes people out the most often.

What, specifically, causes the most problems and what can one do before getting to 121 training to be as prepared as possible?
 
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