Cleared for the option

robzablob

New Member
"Cessna 2121G you are cleared for the option runway 29."

I know what this statement means, however, how does one respond to it?? When said by a controller, I usually respond back "Roger, Cessna 2121G cleared for the option. We'll be making this one full stop." Would it be better for me just to say, "Cessna 2121G, cleared to land" or "cleared touch and go??" I wouldn't want to be putting words into the controller's mouth.

By the way, 2121G is just a registration i made up...dont go looking the FAA aircraft registry to find out what kind of plane it is.

I searched the forum and couldnt find anything regarding this. Sorry if it's a really simple question!! I'm a novice :)

Robbie
 

Clocks

Well-Known Member
If you requested to be cleared for the option then there is probably a reason (practice approaches, instructing) so just read back "...cleared for the option". If you want a full stop then request a full stop, or if you've since changed your mind say "12345 cleared for the option, this will be a full stop and to parking".
 

BajtheJino

I'm looking at you.
"Cessna 2121G you are cleared for the option runway 29."

"Roger, Cessna 2121G cleared for the option. We'll be making this one full stop."
That's a mouthful just to get the option. "Roger" is not necessary since you're reading the clearance back. Identifying yourself as a Cessna is also not needed. Simply replying "21G, cleared option 29" is all you need. First you get the necessary read back, you keep the frequency clear and it just sounds more professional.
 

tobaknight

New Member
:yeahthat: Except unless the controller abbreviated your tail # to "21G", I think you would want to read back the entire 2121G. For all you know he may have another a/c with the tail # 5321G, which he may have previously abbreviated to 21G, or which may just cause momentary confusion as to which a/c is responding.
 

robzablob

New Member
:yeahthat: Except unless the controller abbreviated your tail # to "21G", I think you would want to read back the entire 2121G. For all you know he may have another a/c with the tail # 5321G, which he may have previously abbreviated to 21G, or which may just cause momentary confusion as to which a/c is responding.
I was going to point that out. I've always been taught to state the full reg until the controller abbreviates it.

But, my bad, I dont know why I typed all that out...i have a tendency to type more than i actually say. I wouldnt usually say all of that.

Thanks for the replies though!!

Robbie
 

jtsastre

Well-Known Member
Since "cleared for the option" includes a full stop landing, just repeat "clear for the option" and land. When they realize you're taxiiing off, they'll know you're full stop and give you further instructions thereafter.

Jtsastre
 

sdfcvoh

This is my Custom Title
Cleared for the option means cleared for full stop, stop and go, or touch and go. ATC has decided that spacing is adequate for all "options."

but....


It can't hurt to add your intentions if it is not a touch and go, since that is probably what they are expecting. It might keep someone else behind you from receiving a "go around" call, too.

That said - its all how much you want to get along with ATC or not. Personally, these folks cover my butt on a daily basis, and letting them know my intentions is the LEAST I can do to help with the flow. I think it takes a whopping 1 second to add my intentions to the clearance readback.
 

HiDef

New Member
"Cessna 2121G you are cleared for the option runway 29."

I know what this statement means, however, how does one respond to it?? When said by a controller, I usually respond back "Roger, Cessna 2121G cleared for the option. We'll be making this one full stop." Would it be better for me just to say, "Cessna 2121G, cleared to land" or "cleared touch and go??" I wouldn't want to be putting words into the controller's mouth.

By the way, 2121G is just a registration i made up...dont go looking the FAA aircraft registry to find out what kind of plane it is.

I searched the forum and couldnt find anything regarding this. Sorry if it's a really simple question!! I'm a novice :)

Robbie
I'll buck the trend from everyone else and say I agree with what you posted. Example: Cessna in the pattern practicing T+G's turned inside of another aircraft on final. It may be a tight squeeze but I know if it comes down to it I can give you a low approach and let the trailing aircraft full stop. Its not ideal but it happens. However, if you advise you'll be a full stop I won't try to jam you inside of anyone so everyone gets what they want without any go arounds or low approaches. I'm a controller that likes to know even if a full stop is part of the option. Personal preference I guess.

HD
 

robzablob

New Member
I agree about letting the controller know of my intentions. I know that if I were a controller, after saying "cleared for the option," I would want the aircraft to specify what their intentions are. That way, I'm aware of everything that's happening and don't have to ask again later.

Thanks for everyone's responses, they've really helped me answer my question!

Robbie
 

tgrayson

New Member
I'm a controller that likes to know even if a full stop is part of the option. Personal preference I guess.
That sorta defeats the purpose of the option. The intent, as per the AIM, is that the outcome of the approach is to be a surprise for the pilot in order to provide a training benefit or for evaluation purposes. You can't easily tell the controller without telling the pilot.

IMO, if there is a possible separation issue depending on what the pilot or instructor chooses, the controller should not clear the aircraft for the option.
 

HiDef

New Member
That sorta defeats the purpose of the option. The intent, as per the AIM, is that the outcome of the approach is to be a surprise for the pilot in order to provide a training benefit or for evaluation purposes. You can't easily tell the controller without telling the pilot. I understand the training benefit and don't have a problem with it being used that way. I also know the definition of "cleared for the option" and would never jump a pilot if he full stopped if I had cleared him for the option. Like the definition says, a full stop is part of the option. My point is that if you know you're going to be a full stop and it it's not a hinderence to your operation, then theres no harm in letting the tower know your full intentions, thats all.

IMO, if there is a possible separation issue depending on what the pilot or instructor chooses, the controller should not clear the aircraft for the option. In a perfect world it would all work out just fine everytime but every so often we make mistakes regarding spacing(don't tell anyone I said that) or pilots fly like they're number one to the runway and won't slow down to fit in. Unfortunately the touch and go cessna usually loses to the IFR arrival in those cases. The worst is when theres a huge headwind and the little guy screams in the downwind but then losses all his airspeed on final. I get it right most of the time but sometimes it just doesn't work the way you thought it would.:rolleyes:[/quote]

HD
 

Prino

Well-Known Member
:yeahthat: when being cleared for the option, you are cleared for whatever type of landing you choose...so you should read back "so and so, cleared option 17"....and if you feel the need to tell them it will be full stop, stop and go, or touch and go....then request what you want...no need to request the option if you already know what kind of landing you will be doing.
 

LoadMasterC141

Well-Known Member
I know what is required and what is not per the AIM. However, as a common courtesy, if I have been working a busy pattern doing TnGs, I usually mention if the last one is a full stop. Most controllers seem to like that.

There is one witch of a controller at Gray that likes to beat up everything you say, so the one time I said it to her, she said "I told you that you are cleared for the option already". OK lady....so sorry for trying to be nice.
 

SeeYA@GFK

Well-Known Member
I prefer the pilot to advise me when he/she will be making a full stop after an option clearance or upon landing rollout. This allows me to plan accordingly with other traffic in the pattern and IFR inbounds.

When I was starting my training at GFK I got in the habit of clearing everybody for the option. This bit me pretty hard on one occasion when I got busy and forgot about an aircraft that I cleared and they exited the runway on their own and contacted ground back to the ramp. I still had the aircraft written on my notepad and it took me a few mintues to figure out what happened. No fault to the pilot because it was busy and they didn't want to congest the frequency any more.

Obviously when it's busy a couple mintues is way to long to try and piece the puzzle back together. Now it's back to clearing the aircraft on what they orginally asked on initial call up or the standard stop and go.
 
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