Civil Air Patrol

beavis

New Member
I am very interested in the Civil Air Patrol. Hwoever, I have heard a lot of differing things about the Civil Air Patrol.

I think I read on here somewhere that any experience you have with Civil Air Patrol doesn't mean squat for the airlines unless you are a check pilot. If that is true, how do I become a check pilot??

Also is the Civil Air Patrol a civilian or military organization? I heard taht it was a military organization but it is "Civilian" Air Patrol, right?? I am very confused.

any information you can provide would be very appreciated!!!
 

pilatus028

New Member
I'm joining the Coast Guard Aux. at least down here in South Florida they fly more then the Civil Air Patrol and I like the organization.

Clem
 

Acadia

Well-Known Member
Not sure about the time question. As far as I know is PIC is PIC. I cant imagine why time spent flying PIC in a CAP 172 would be any different than flying a 172 for scenics or towing.

There are probably some good and bad points to the CAP. I know that in my neck of the woods the CAP is filled with wanna be know it all dorks. I went to one meeting and I could not get out of the building fast enough. (there were some good folks mixed in, but many to many idiots). Go to a meeting at your local CAP and learn about all the weird CAP rules and decide if you can stand it or not.
 

triplec76

Well-Known Member
They are out there for a good cause, but I do have to agree some or a lot are know-it-alls. Ive had a lot that like to bark orders too. On busy days, I would always let them know that there was a line for fuel and they were at the back of it. If they were going out on a mission, it would be different, but when they return for the day they expected you to be down at their T hangar waiting on them. Not me.
 

CK

Well-Known Member
They just changed the prices on our airplanes
Used to be $25 an hour wet, now it's $20 an hour dry. No point in even renting it for all the hassle you have to go through..........
 

speedman

New Member
Im a cadet in CAP and from what I can see our pilots dont really fly alot. It depends on what squadron your in though as some fly more than others. Im pretty sure that to be a mission pilot you have to hold a commercial ticket and pass a CAP check ride.

CAP is not military. it's the Auxiliary of the USAF. Its run like a military organization(USAF) but isnt.
 

aloft

New Member
I've posted my thoughts on CAP in a number of previous threads, do a search for them. Bottom line--in my opinion, CAP remains a worthwhile use of one's time--the quality of which, like anything else, is directly proportional to what you put into it; it's a volunteer organization that is only as good or bad as its volunteers make it. Just like every other organization, volunteer or not, there are pockets of excellence and pockets of •e; the sort of unit you'll have locally is a crapshoot.

Citationkid, when you find a late-model C-172 or 182 for rent anywhere else for anywhere near $20/hr dry, you just let me know.
 

Eagle

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I think I read on here somewhere that any experience you have with Civil Air Patrol doesn't mean squat for the airlines unless you are a check pilot. If that is true, how do I become a check pilot??

[/ QUOTE ]

Most of this has been covered on the forums before. use the search command and try that.

Otherwise I doubt being check pilot is muc different or any more "distinguished" than just being a pilot with the CAP like most things, I suspect it is just wait long enough and you move up the ranks.
 

CK

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]

Citationkid, when you find a late-model C-172 or 182 for rent anywhere else for anywhere near $20/hr dry, you just let me know.

[/ QUOTE ]

Well first off you can't fly our airplane 50 miles from the home field. So all you can really do, which is all I really need it for, is practicing landings and take off. Second off we got offered a 50/50 deal in a T182RG for $25 dry and no other expences so we mind as well take it if it weren't based on a grass strip with a messed up nose wheel.

I am in no way complaining just to let you all know, and am in no way saying I don't get enough flying...........
 

ricecakecm

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I think I read on here somewhere that any experience you have with Civil Air Patrol doesn't mean squat for the airlines unless you are a check pilot. If that is true, how do I become a check pilot??

Also is the Civil Air Patrol a civilian or military organization? I heard taht it was a military organization but it is "Civilian" Air Patrol, right?? I am very confused.


[/ QUOTE ]

I'm a check pilot for CAP and also a Wing (state) Operations Training Officer. You have to be a CFI and attend a weekend long course (National Check Pilot Standardization Course) which I suppose is similar (but not as intense) as what DE's go through with the FAA. Lots of stuff on evaluation, judgement, etc. You also have to be selected by the Wing (state) Director of Operations or Standardizaton/Evaluations Officer and then appointed by the Wing Commander.

Overall, being a check pilot is kind of interesting. Some check pilots think they're FAA Inspectors or DEs and have the attitude to go with it. I think a checkride (especially one that isn't for a certificate or rating) should be a learning experience and try to go at it from that angle. You see a lot of different pilots and see different ways of doing things, which are sometimes better.

It's a civilian organization. However it's the USAF Auxiliary, so it has military ties. Especially in the cadet program. In the flying/operations side of things, you can avoid a lot of the military type stuff if you choose to.

Any organization is going to have people who are morons. CAP tends to attract more than it's fair share. However, it's a good organization with a good purpose. I've been a member for 10 years now...started as a cadet and later turned senior member.
 

GaTechKid

Well-Known Member
I'd just like to add that I was a cadet for 5 years in CAP and my experience with the program was excellent. The program has many opportunities for you to be involved in aviation both as a cadet and a senior member, however my experience was from a cadet's perspective. If you have not already, I would suggest going here and reading as much as you can before you look up a local squadron.
 

beavis

New Member
Thanks to everyone for their replies!!!

If you have to be appointed by the state director and commander I take that their are not very many check pilots out there. Is it that selective?? And how does a check pilot rate for the airlines?? I mean if the commander has to apoint you then it has to be very very good for your resume.

I have read the various posts on here about it and not quite sure about it. Sounds like I can learn alot from it but I am not sure if it is worth the time especially if theres not as much flying time as theyt claim to have. I thought there was alot of flying but it sounds like theres not.
 

ricecakecm

Well-Known Member
Well, the reason you have to be appointed is to control the number of check pilots out there. It also helps keep control of who is and who isn't a check pilot. You want enough check pilots to keep the workload to a reasonable level, but you also don't want so many out there that you can't stay standardized. It all depends on the size of the Wing. Some wings like California have probably 75 or more check pilots. Missouri is a smaller wing with something like 12-15 check pilots.

I don't know how being a check pilot looks to the airlines. I don't think it would hurt you. It's showing you have experience in evaluating other pilots and taking on additional responsibility by giving checkrides.

The amount of flying you do depends on several things. One, your availibility. The more time you have open, the more flying you can do. Also, your qualifications. As a Check Pilot, I fly quite a bit giving checkrides. I'm also a Mission Pilot, so I do a fair amount of search and rescue flying. I'm also a Cadet Orientation Pilot, which could lead to lots of hours if I used that qualification more than I do. The number of pilots in your area and the number of airplanes in your area plays a role in how much you fly. Also, the more people know you, the more you fly.

When I was first starting out as a CAP pilot, not many people knew me and I didn't have any qualifications other than as a pilot (about all I could do was use the planes for proficiency). As I started adding certificates and ratings and building time, I added qualifications and started flying more and more. Once I got appointed as a check pilot and qualified as a mission pilot (about the same time), my flying time with CAP really started to pick up. In July of 03, I flew over 40 hours for CAP.
 

aloft

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
In July of 03, I flew over 40 hours for CAP.

[/ QUOTE ]A whopping 6.4 of those with yours truly.
(wait....that was June)

Btw, ricecake-boy got his-sef hitched this weekend, help me give him a nice warm JetCareers "congratulations..........sucka!"


 
Top