Citation Type Rating

AV8R_N8

Well-Known Member
Hello. I am considering getting a type rating for a Cessna Citation, for the experience, and also to make me more marketable to the airlines. I was looking at the program that ATP has. Its a 4 day program. 1st day is ground, 2nd is ground, sim, & flight. 3rd is ground, sim, & flight. and 4th is a checkride. They send you Training material before you start for you to go over. Being where I am at right now. Commercial Multi-Engine Instrument Pilot, with about 550 hours, and 100 hours multi, will it be pretty difficult to do such a rating without any previous Turbine time? I am pretty determined in aviation, and when it comes to learning something new, I could do it all day and all night. But the thing that concerns me the most is stepping up from a Beechcraft Duchess that cruises at about 140 knots straight to a Cessna Citation which I am assuming has an approach speed somewhere close to 140 knots. Anyone have any comments, tips? Thanks in advance.
 

Eagle

New Member
unless you have a job lined up do not waste your money. I have plenty of time in a CE-500 as a FO and I doubt the type rating would be a walk in th park for me. So with about 500 hrs tt you may bite off more than you can chew.
 

C650CPT

Well-Known Member
AV8R N8
Since you posted this three different times I will answer you three times: Don't do it, Don't do it, Don't do it.
It serves absolutely no purpose at this point in your career, except ego. In fact it would be considered very negatively by experienced and potential employers. If some one was offering you a job today based on you haveing a type, I still would say Don't do it. A professional organization should never require this ( I have the same opionion about south west airlines requireing a 737 type rateing for thier new hires, its BS). The Bible has a proverb about a fool and his money soon being parted, don't be a fool.
 

TravelinMan

New Member
I am 100% positive that this thread will soon be moved to the squak box, as it usually does when one brings up the whole SWA type-rating requirement. That SWA requires a type rating is just another way of narrowing the applicants, and cutting overhead. It would be different if they made you pay them directly, and they made money off of you. In which case that would be major BS. And who can blame them for keeping costs down? You may even see other airlines follow suit in light of the current financial situations of most airlines today.
 

Minuteman

“Dongola”
I thought it was a deal where if you got the type rating within six months, Southwest would reimburse ya. Do they not do that anymore?
 

TravelinMan

New Member
I have never heard of that. Not saying it doesn't exist, or didn't exist. From the way it has been discussed, I would say no.
 

giants_fan

New Member
No that story got way twisted!

Southwest never has and never will reimburse for types.

They used to allow you to interview without the type and then gave you six months to get it. That stopped after 9-11.
 

smokey1

Well-Known Member
The Southwest first officer I talked to last month in Dallas said that they still have the program where you may interview without the type rating. Would a type-rating in Boeing Business Jet be the same as getting typed in the 737?
Smoke.
 

giants_fan

New Member
If they have allowed interviews without a 737 type it is news to me. I would think that would get around pretty fast.

I hope they do. Great place to work.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
The last time I was on SWA's site - about three months ago give or take - they still required a 737 rating to interview.
 

Minuteman

“Dongola”
They must waffle on the requirement. I also now seem to recall 'em, for a period, requiring a type to interview during the even leaner times. But on the southwest.com today:
[ QUOTE ]
A candidate may apply without a B-737 Type Rating. If a candidate interviews and successfully completes the entire selection process, he/she has 6 months from that date to obtain a B-737 Type Rating to be eligible for hire.

[/ QUOTE ]Still doesn't look like they pay for it.

And another note from their site:[ QUOTE ]
Southwest received 243,657 resumes and hired 5,042 new Employees in 2002

[/ QUOTE ]Nothing like a little smack from reality ... I feel sorry for those poor bastards in the other 98%.
 

N9103M

Well-Known Member
Don't go out and get a type.....

Mabye a contract job will come up every now and then, but most employers want current FSI or Simuflite training. Or a current 8410....

Save the money....

Plus your first jet is a tough experience to get used to, you are going to start planning way before you used to even ponder things in a Dutchess.
 

viper548

Well-Known Member
I was at the airport today and saw a guy who owns a Citation 501....I gave him my name and number and told him if he ever needed a type rated co-pilot to give me a call...That's one good reason to get the type rating!!
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
Arn't 501's able to be single pilot certified? With that, what's the point of having a co-pilot?
 

ricecakecm

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Arn't 501's able to be single pilot certified? With that, what's the point of having a co-pilot?

[/ QUOTE ]

Insurance may require it.
 

rausda27

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
Arn't 501's able to be single pilot certified? With that, what's the point of having a co-pilot?

[/ QUOTE ]

Insurance may require it.

[/ QUOTE ]

Insurance may require it or if the autopilot is inop it is required...
 

viper548

Well-Known Member
I haven't gotten a call from him. I had two chances earlier this year to go as co-pilot. Once a guy needed a type rated co-pilot for 2 weeks. A different guy needed someone for a day. Didn't get to do either because my squadron got activated.
the 501 is single pilot cert. He doesn't NEED a co-pilot if all the equipment works, but it's always a good idea to have an extra set of eyes in the front row. Safety is also another reason. 2 pilots are 4-5 times safer than a single pilot.
 

viper548

Well-Known Member
As an instructor, I could also give instruction in his plane. He may need an IPC sometime. BFR's aren't a problem because the annual 61.58 takes care of that.
 
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