Cirrus SR-22

cointyro

New Member
Hey, what do you guys think of the Cirrus aircraft? Two models, SR-20 (200 HP) and -22 (310 HP). Jus tread a book my James Fallows entitled Free Flight that covered a lot of information on the Cirrus company. Neat that the plane comes standard with a full-airframe parachute. Apparently there was some controversy over this feature. What do you think about having a 'chute on your plane?

Just thought I'd start a discussion on Cirrus aircraft, and/or similar planes from Lancair and Diamond. Should Cessna and Piper be concerned by these startups? Diamond seems to be doing well; but Cirrus isn't quite as popular...
 

MissedApproach

Well-Known Member
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Jus tread a book my James Fallows entitled Free Flight that covered a lot of information on the Cirrus company.

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Heh, I just did a book review in economics about that book. I didn't read it but it didn't stop me from writing a three page review of it, or from getting an "A" on it for that matter.
 

cointyro

New Member
Yeah, there are some funny quotes in there. One guy talks about how most pilots are pretty fiscally conservative. During his checkride his instructor lectured him about how the govt's only role was to provide a military and pay for runways! Lol.

I've heard that most pilots are as libertarian as possible, except for their own jobs, in which case they are as pro-union as possible. I'd do the same thing : )
 

davetheflyer

New Member
Back to the original topic:

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Just thought I'd start a discussion on Cirrus aircraft, and/or similar planes from Lancair and Diamond. Should Cessna and Piper be concerned by these startups? Diamond seems to be doing well; but Cirrus isn't quite as popular...




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I've never flown a Cirrus, Lancair, or Diamond, but I did get a close look at a Cirrus at the dealership in St. Augustine. It was really nice. There was a lot of difference between it and the spam cans. It was extremely cool.

The Cesspipers have two things going for them. One is that they are proven airframes. That is to say that they have been around forever with very few changes. The good thing about this is that they have most of the bugs worked out of them. The down side is that they are 1940s technology at 2003 prices.

The other thing is that Cessna and Piper are household names in aviation. A well known name is a powerful thing in business. Cessna and Piper are trading largely off of name recognition. At some point, Cirrus may become almost as well known as Cessna and Piper, if they keep building sharp looking, cutting edge airplanes.

I think that Cessna and Piper should definitely be concerned.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
Did their wierd stall / spin characteristics get figured out yet? I know there were a few wierd accidents where people were doing ordinary stall work and ended up spinning into the ground. The chute was never pulled for unknown reasons.

The plane wasn't spin tested because supposedly the parachute can save you in the spin.

The one guy saved by the chute (as far as I know) happened after the alieron separated from the aircraft. The chute was pulled and the guy walked away. But my question is why did the alieron come off in the first place?

Other than that, just about everything I've heard / read is positive and I would jump at the chance to fly it.

I did fly the Katana (DA20-C1) for a while and it's nowhere near the performance of the Cirrus... but it looks like the same design with the all composite construction with no rivets and sleek shape.

That thing was a blast... the seats are tilted back, you have a cool single stick yoke between your legs, and the throttle is a cool looking lever in the center console.... much more impressive than the cheap Cessna knob throttles. It climbed at 1000fpm on a normal day around here (65-75 degrees F), it cruised at 135 TAS, and the visibility was fantastic. The engine quit on me once after rollout on the landing at MYF in San Diego. I just got off the runway and the thing idled to a stop; probably vapor lock but it was only 65 or so oustide. Good thing I didn't go around...

It's one big fault was the fact that it was really hard to slow down and descend. Not that that's a big problem (prior planning) but Vfe was only 78 and it only took a little bit of power to get it going much faster than that. Final approach speed was only 58ish, and if tower put you on a long descending final you'd have to pull the power back and slow up pretty early; that could be bad if you're in the pattern with a twin and a Bonanza. It did have 45 degrees of flaps though! Oh that, and it's VFR only
.

I can only immagine what the 300hp Cirrus flys like after having flown the 125hp Katana!
 

Flyer27

New Member
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The one guy saved by the chute (as far as I know) happened after the alieron separated from the aircraft. The chute was pulled and the guy walked away. But my question is why did the alieron come off in the first place?

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Because the shop that did the work forgot to put one of the bolts back on when it was put back together. It was a failure waiting to happen.


The plane was in for an AD on the aileron, and when it got done, one of the bolts was left off by mistake.
 

SkyKingRon

New Member
Well, I've flown the Cirrus SR-22 and it kicks ass! Sweet all around. Where to start, bubble canopy and great view, panel decked out with Avidyne FlightMax PFD, TCAS very handy "traffic" it says and shows you on the PFD where and at what alt. Weeping wing de-ice, four roomy seats, and oh yea it has a joystick yoke mounted on the left or right elbow rest that you just easily move to steer. Fast and responsive. My friend Bill is the Pacific Northwest's sales rep so I've been up a few and it's a smokin' ride. Were cruising along and he says go ahead and bank it so I bank it a bit slow and easy and he says no, bank it, "LIKE THIS" and whoosh in a split sec we are turned sideways( don't know at what angle, probably around 45 or so but wasn't looking!) but it's quick and responsive. I tried it like that and yea, it's a gas.

On the new issue of Flying (June) which I just got yesterday there is an article on p.19 by Dick on the Cirrus and accident rate statistics. I haven't finished the article because I had to go but check it out yourself. I' ve been talking to Bill and reading some articles for the past year or so and my general take is the aircraft is fine, it's been the pilots who have screwed up one way or another, just as in any aircraft, they all have points that can be unforgiving to error.The chute pull (first one ever) that the pilot walked away from was due to a mechanics error.

All in all, I think it is a great aircraft and has a lot going for it.

If you or anyone is interested in going for a demo ride, Bill is low/no pressure and would love to have you take 'er up. I have another friend also in my flying group that has one and he loves it. Call or email Bill Hollenbeck at 503-788-3030 (cell) or hav2fly@attbi.com. The cirrus web site is cirrusdesign.com. We are located in Portland Ore. but Bill would be glad to fly to wherever to show you. The Cirrus plant is in Duluth,MN.

Well that was alot of info, and I could have gone on longer but...
 

N9103M

Well-Known Member
I've flown both the 20 and the 22. They are both fantastic machines. A great combination of automation and a great flying airplane. Both would make a great single to do some long haul flying. The Sidestick is great and the cockpit seating is the most comfortable I've been in.

--03M
 
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