Cirrus SR-22

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Hey guys…

My mother, who is a nurse, recently took a job in Labor & Delivery and she met a Doctor who turns out to be an instrument rated private pilot as well. After talking with him, she found out that he currently owns an RV-8, but he’s in the process of buying a Cirrus SR-22. Anyway, my mother, of course, told him that I was a pilot working on my instrument rating. From what I gather he only fly’s for recreational purposes and really doesn’t have anyone to fly with. He said he would be interested in flying with me once he got his new plane. (we can’t fit in the RV that he currently has)

While I’m not holding my breath, I think this could be an excellent opportunity for me to build some hours for cheap and possibly even free!

Is anyone familiar with the SR-22?
 

canuck goose

New Member
I'm not familiar with it, but I've read several articles about it. It's one fine plane ...great handling, great performances (310hp engine) and the cockpit ...well you've got to see it to believe it! It even comes with the CAPS (Cirrus Airframe Parachute System) for a "little" extra.
 

JaceTheAce

Well-Known Member
I've seen the parachute system in action on Discovery Wings channel - it's really neat. Nice plane - low price/running costs and it's fast.
 

chunk75

Well-Known Member
I'd stay away from stalling the aircraft until some of the recent accidents involving stalls are full analyzed. Besides that, SWEET airplane!
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Nice plane - low price/running costs and it's fast.

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I just looked at the Cirrus website, and depending on your definition of "low running costs" it may be either high or low.

It burns about 18gph with a 6 cylinder engine and costs around $300,000 new. That's pretty expensive for a single, especially when you compare it to a 172, but it does cruise at 180kts... so at least you’re getting some pretty good speed for your money...

I guess when you compare those operating cost to that of a twin, which may actually cruise slower than the R-22, it’s not all that bad…
 

JaceTheAce

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
Nice plane - low price/running costs and it's fast.

[/ QUOTE ]

I just looked at the Cirrus website, and depending on your definition of "low running costs" it may be either high or low.

It burns about 18gph with a 6 cylinder engine and costs around $300,000 new. That's pretty expensive for a single, especially when you compare it to a 172, but it does cruise at 180kts... so at least you’re getting some pretty good speed for your money...

I guess when you compare those operating cost to that of a twin, which may actually cruise slower than the R-22, it’s not all that bad…


[/ QUOTE ]

Yes, I'm comparing costs to what performance you get out of it. Definately the Cirrus does not compare to the 172 in operating costs.
 

N9103M

Well-Known Member
The SR-22 is a fantastic aircraft. It flies like a dream, has a 310 horse IO-550 and a SWEET avionics package. Only problems I ran into were, lack of cowl flaps, so you will often see soaring CHT, and it is a pain in the A$$ to slow down with out shock-cooling the engine. My favorite GA airplane hands-down.
 

iceman21

Well-Known Member
The club I am joining has 2 SR-20s and 1 SR-22. Unfortunately they require you to go through a 13 hour training course before they will sign you off on the airplane.

I haven't decided if I want to invest the money to get the checkout done, and then rent one for 135.00/hour tach.

Here's a pic of the panel

 

cimepilot

Well-Known Member
I have flown the SR-22 two times. The airplane is awesome to say the least! We cruised at 180 knots and slowed for some quick maneuvers. The non-conventional side stick is a little hard to get used to. It is a very sensitive aircraft and responds even with a light feather touch on the stick. I did some steep turns and with a blink of an eye was in a 70 degree bank angle. The aircraft handled great though.

The amount of power is ridiculous (310HP). You accelerate like a bat out of hell on the takeoff roll. The takeoff roll in a Piper Seminole doesn't even compare to the "kick back" you get when advancing full throttle in the Cirrus. It climbs great (2,000-2,500fpm). One weird thing...it is a constant speed prop with no prop lever. The RPM setting is automatically set based on your current phase of flight and current manifold pressure setting.

The plane out runs most light twin aircraft and has the CAPS for added safety. If you have the chance to fly it, go for it! You'll never want to go back to a GA single-engine airplane other than the Cirrus. Good Luck and have fun!
 

aloft

New Member
That's not the panel I'm talking about; I mean the one with the huge LCD primary flight display. I'll look for a photo.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Hmmm...

This brings up an interesting question… I'm guessing since it’s "high performance", I'll have to get checked out in it to actually be able to log the time right? In other words if I do get to fly with this guy, and want to log it, I couldn't without the sign off?

I wonder where I would have to go and how much I'd have to pay to get such a thing??

Any Ideas?
 

iceman21

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
That's not the panel I'm talking about; I mean the one with the huge LCD primary flight display. I'll look for a photo.

[/ QUOTE ]

I know what you are talking about, that pic is of an SR-20 panel anyway. I will see if I can dig it up too!
 

iceman21

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Hmmm...

This brings up an interesting question… I'm guessing since it’s "high performance", I'll have to get checked out in it to actually be able to log the time right? In other words if I do get to fly with this guy, and want to log it, I couldn't without the sign off?

I wonder where I would have to go and how much I'd have to pay to get such a thing??

Any Ideas?


[/ QUOTE ]

You would have to get a sign off to log the time. One way to do it cheap would be to fly with the doctor guy to familiarize yourself in it, then go up with an instructor and get him to endorse your high performance.
 

sbe

Well-Known Member
flyitup - you do NOT have to have a high perf signoff to log the time. PROVIDED the owner is flying with you, and he holds the proper endorsement. HE is the ACTing PIC. You, when you are the sole manipulator, are the LOGging PIC. However, unless he is a CFI or is acting as a safety pilot, only YOU can log time while manipulating the controls

We just went through this debate over on studentpilot.com. Please reference Doc's FAR page (which is awesome, BTW) for information regarding this very subject matter:

http://www.propilot.com/doc/logging2.html#PIC

FAR 61.51(e)(1)(i) states you can log PIC time when you are sole manipulator of the controls of an aircraft for which you are rated. "Rated" does NOT include endorsements.

61.31 covers endorsements and specifically states you cannot ACT as PIC without the endorsements needed for various aircraft (complex, high perf, tailwheel).

So the big difference here is LOGging PIC time, and ACTing as PIC. You, without your endorsement, can LOG, but you MUST have the endorsement to ACT.

If anyone disagrees with this, please visit Doc's FAR link above (that site is invaluable), or I will provide the link to the Studentpilot.com thread that I personally started along this same vein, except in my case the matter pertained to a tailwheel aircraft.

Therefore, this would be something to cover with the aircraft's owner prior to flight. Hope you get the chance, sounds like a sweet deal.

Sarah
 

drumminpilot

Well-Known Member
I just had this same discussion except regarding complex time. You're exactly right though, you CAN log it with someone with a Hi-Perf sign-off, but you just can't ACT as PIC unless you get one.

side note- flyitup- I can get you someone over here to get you a Hi-Perf signoff if you need. It would either be a 182 or 210 I think. PM me if you want the phone numbers.
 
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