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machvista

Well-Known Member
Quick question... now that I have my PPL it's time for me to try new planes. I'm planning on taking a few buddies on a x-country to grab a bite somewhere. I trained in the 152 for my whole PPL training and now I'm trying to decide on which my next checkout should be for me and a couple guys. Would the 182 be more cost efficient or the 172 for decent x countrys?
 

Muff3n

Well-Known Member
I would guess that you could get a 172 for a much better deal than a 182 and you wouldn't have to shell out nearly as much money, if you find a 180hp 172 that is a great airplane for cross countries, it isn't very fast, but you can haul more than one buddy and still take full fuel, I have found that the extra 20 horsepower between a 160hp and a 180hp 172 makes a considerable difference and is much more pleasant to fly.
 

Rotor2Wing

Unapologetically American
Depending on the budget you could do both the 182/172. Do the 182 and get your HP endorsement at the same time. Then an hour in the 172 and you have a checkout in both.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
I did exactly this - got checked out in the 172 after getting my ppl in a 152. The extra space and hair more performance in the 172 (especially if it's a 180hp model) is kinda nice. For pax who are new to GA, it's less intimidating than a 152.

I'd also recommend trying to get checked out in a Diamond - either a DA-20 or DA-40. The DA-20 is a LOT of fun to fly, and it's nimble and fuel-efficient and goes faster than a 152, generally not too expensive. I've never flown a DA-40 but I've heard a LOT of good things about them.

One other path I'd HIGHLY recommend - go and get a tailwheel endorsement. I never realized just how sloppy I was with the rudder until I received tailwheel training. Probably the best thing I've done to improve my flying.
 

Autothrust Blue

"Duuuuuude."
I did exactly this - got checked out in the 172 after getting my ppl in a 152. The extra space and hair more performance in the 172 (especially if it's a 180hp model) is kinda nice. For pax who are new to GA, it's less intimidating than a 152.
It's not a huge deal to go between 152-172-182 once you've gotten a few hours in each airplane, I think. The sight picture in the 182 is a bit different (big cowling), but the 182 is my favorite nosedragger of the 100-series.

(It isn't overly high performance, just heavier with more horses up front...but you can get your HP endorsement in them.)

I really enjoyed flying different airplanes after I got my private in the 172P/S. It makes you a better pilot. Go out and try it!

I'd also recommend trying to get checked out in a Diamond - either a DA-20 or DA-40. The DA-20 is a LOT of fun to fly, and it's nimble and fuel-efficient and goes faster than a 152, generally not too expensive. I've never flown a DA-40 but I've heard a LOT of good things about them.
Fly a Diamond, and you'll throw ROCKS at anything Cessna builds in the high-wing category. Crisp, snappy, slippery, fast, and sipping fuel? Yes please.

One other path I'd HIGHLY recommend - go and get a tailwheel endorsement. I never realized just how sloppy I was with the rudder until I received tailwheel training. Probably the best thing I've done to improve my flying.
Tailwheel and aerobatic flying is the best flight training I've received (in a GA airplane). This, hugely. It'll teach you how to REALLY fly.

(in before WacoFan)
 

machvista

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the replies! I think I'm gonna try a new school that has diamonds. Always wanted to fly them anyway!

Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
Thanks for the replies! I think I'm gonna try a new school that has diamonds. Always wanted to fly them anyway!

Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2
Good call. But - seriously - try some tailwheel flying. It's so damned fun.
 

cmill

Cold Ass Honky
Good call. But - seriously - try some tailwheel flying. It's so damned fun.
This.

Some of the best pilots ive met did their initial in tail wheels. They had 500 hours and could fly circles around guys with 1000 hours who didnt know anything about tail wheels.
 

machvista

Well-Known Member
I'd love to get my tail wheel. Only issue is finding an instructor and a tailwheel plane around here.
 

Mike H

Well-Known Member
182 is a big jump from a 152... Might want to try the skyhawk first.
The insurance company will probably want this too. Most places will require 100 to 125 hours total time before they'll allow a new pilot to fly a 182 for anything other than receiving dual instruction.
 

skypilot6

Well-Known Member
are you looking for a comercial cert later on? Youll need X-C time, slower 172 = more x-c time than a faster 182 of course
 

F9DXER

Well-Known Member
This may also help in your decision. What will be your total payload? Can the 172 carry that and if so, how much fuel? What if the FBO has already topped off the tanks just prior to you wanting to rent. Unless you call and tell them not to, they have no idea what you plan on hauling. This happened to me and I ended up renting an Archer, even though the 172 is more suited for sightseeing IMO
 
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