Check airman

ozziecat35

4 out of 5 great lakes prefer Michigan.
Yep, already learning some of the “‘isms.”
11,000 and descending, flight idle, 1600 fpm will get you 250 by 10k. Fuel flow doubled translates roughly into IAS. Go down and slow down without boards...pick 1. 2 great LCA’s thus far, not hanging onto the tail still, I’ve made it up to the lav or maybe row 8 on a good day.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
No ASAPs for my upgrade OE. I thought the hardest part would have been flying and landing with the sidestick in the left hand, but that turned out to be the easiest part. The hardest part? The lights. and. The seat adjustments. Reaching for the recline and I grabbed the vertical adjustment and go whoosh straight down. That only happened about 20 times.
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
No ASAPs for my upgrade OE. I thought the hardest part would have been flying and landing with the sidestick in the left hand, but that turned out to be the easiest part. The hardest part? The lights. and. The seat adjustments. Reaching for the recline and I grabbed the vertical adjustment and go whoosh straight down. That only happened about 20 times.
Hardest part of a new airplane is figuring out the new places for all yer stuff...
 

TUCKnTRUCK

That guy
No ASAPs for my upgrade OE. I thought the hardest part would have been flying and landing with the sidestick in the left hand, but that turned out to be the easiest part. The hardest part? The lights. and. The seat adjustments. Reaching for the recline and I grabbed the vertical adjustment and go whoosh straight down. That only happened about 20 times.
Vertical adjustment is nearly always the opposite side from the oh “crap” handle, assuming your plane has one. Designed so you can hold it while adjusting vertical.

Switching back and forth doing oe - this was “tell”.
 

falconvalley

Well-Known Member
Yep, already learning some of the “‘isms.”
11,000 and descending, flight idle, 1600 fpm will get you 250 by 10k. Fuel flow doubled translates roughly into IAS. Go down and slow down without boards...pick 1. 2 great LCA’s thus far, not hanging onto the tail still, I’ve made it up to the lav or maybe row 8 on a good day.
You’re way ahead of where I was on my first jet. I didn’t learn decel tricks until regular line flying. After OE, I could take off, land, do a preflight, spin the whiz wheel, and point out the flight attendant. That was about it.


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No ASAPs for my upgrade OE. I thought the hardest part would have been flying and landing with the sidestick in the left hand, but that turned out to be the easiest part. The hardest part? The lights. and. The seat adjustments. Reaching for the recline and I grabbed the vertical adjustment and go whoosh straight down. That only happened about 20 times.
Just after upgrade OE I accidentally tried to answer the FA on center when she called, only slightly embarrassing! I also keep reaching for the trim and the VS wheel in the wrong places.
 

Autothrust Blue

The frakkin’ CAG
Just after upgrade OE I accidentally tried to answer the FA on center when she called, only slightly embarrassing! I also keep reaching for the trim and the VS wheel in the wrong places.
I figure if you can figure out the audio control panel in any new-to-you airplane in reasonably short order, the remainder of it is cake.
 
I figure if you can figure out the audio control panel in any new-to-you airplane in reasonably short order, the remainder of it is cake.
It was the same plane for me, but everything is backwardso_O! Been flying my Pacer from the left so muscle memory for yoke and power levers/throttle are good.
 

Cav

Former Maddog Whisperer
Yep, already learning some of the “‘isms.”
11,000 and descending, flight idle, 1600 fpm will get you 250 by 10k. Fuel flow doubled translates roughly into IAS. Go down and slow down without boards...pick 1. 2 great LCA’s thus far, not hanging onto the tail still, I’ve made it up to the lav or maybe row 8 on a good day.
Late to the party but a hearty congrats on all your recent achievements. It seems like you have a great attitude that will serve you well. As others have said don’t stop learning and glean as much as you can off the guys you fly with. It’ll help you learn all different techniques and styles that will serve you not only now but in the future. It’s not just limited to flying but also decision making, leadership, customer service, etc. The list is endless but it will help you develop your own style and efficiency. Emulate the good captains you fly with and take equal note of the bad.

It’s interesting to read this thread after reading your simulator thread. It sounds obvious but perhaps it will help others. The process of feeling out of your comfort zone is one that will be repeated throughout our careers. New jobs, new airplanes, new theaters, new seats in the same airplane. They all cause that feeling. You felt it in the sim and you successfully chopped away at it. You felt it again on IOE. Same result. Guess what, you’ll feel it again when hit the line without the training wheels on. Recognize and acknowledge that feeling when it appears. Be confident and trudge on knowing you’ll be successful but never be afraid or too proud to seek assistance. Knowing our limits is in large part our professional duty.

Congrats and enjoy the ride!
 
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ozziecat35

4 out of 5 great lakes prefer Michigan.
@Cav thanks for the kind words. Ended up getting signed off from OE after 2 trips (minimum for my company) and just completed day 1 today of getting kicked out of the nest...Captain was late from his commute and didn’t arrive until 8 minutes before push. I had my side done but figured I may as well do his stuff since we learned it all in CPT anyways. He arrived, double checked everything, asked how many years I’ve been with the company. When I told him it was day 1 of post IOE, he was pretty floored...

My leg, gen failure on approach which kicked the screens off for a few seconds... “guess I’m handflying it, QRH please.”

I learned the line is NOTHING like IOE, which is NOTHING like sims.
#todaywasagoodday
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
@Cav thanks for the kind words. Ended up getting signed off from OE after 2 trips (minimum for my company) and just completed day 1 today of getting kicked out of the nest...Captain was late from his commute and didn’t arrive until 8 minutes before push. I had my side done but figured I may as well do his stuff since we learned it all in CPT anyways. He arrived, double checked everything, asked how many years I’ve been with the company. When I told him it was day 1 of post IOE, he was pretty floored...

My leg, gen failure on approach which kicked the screens off for a few seconds... “guess I’m handflying it, QRH please.”

I learned the line is NOTHING like IOE, which is NOTHING like sims.
#todaywasagoodday
 
@Cav thanks for the kind words. Ended up getting signed off from OE after 2 trips (minimum for my company) and just completed day 1 today of getting kicked out of the nest...Captain was late from his commute and didn’t arrive until 8 minutes before push. I had my side done but figured I may as well do his stuff since we learned it all in CPT anyways. He arrived, double checked everything, asked how many years I’ve been with the company. When I told him it was day 1 of post IOE, he was pretty floored...

My leg, gen failure on approach which kicked the screens off for a few seconds... “guess I’m handflying it, QRH please.”

I learned the line is NOTHING like IOE, which is NOTHING like sims.
#todaywasagoodday
Funny how things seem to go to crap after your done flying with a checkairman.
 

Screaming_Emu

Dogsheep
I’m on trip 2 of FO IOE right now and my LCA even mentioned when I started trying to configure 8 miles out from the faf, “Yeah, our job is to wean you off the sim profiles and into the real world.”

First approach into ORD with 180 to the marker I was defecating bricks...it’s slowing down now though.
On the 200 the gear is an amazing tool. Especially since you can’t use the flaps above 8 knots.

I referred to them as the redneck speed brakes
 

LostComm

Well-Known Member
For the line check airmen/women of the board:
What's the most useful advice you could pass on to someone who may be new to instructing/who was never a CFI? A friend thinks he's capable of such tasks and has been reading up quite a bit on FOI etc but still has some doubts, outside of the mentoring of normal line FOs he has no experience teaching in an airplane.
Don't touch anything red or dusty.
 
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