changing airlines

rod

New Member
I am a little confused on a point, and have not been able to locate an answer within the forums. I understand that pay scales, schedules, etc., at major airlines are based on seniority. That part's clear. But what if, say, you worked at one airline for 20 years, and then switched to a different airline for some reason (laid off, etc.). Would you start back at the beginning of the pay scale, as FO on a smaller plane, etc.? Your seniority level would indeed be very low at the new job. But that doesn't seem to make a whole lot of sense to me.


Thanks in advance.

Rod
 
It doesn't make sense, but that's the way it works. Your seniority at one airline will not change where you start at a new airline...the bottom. So, the guys getting furloughed at US Airways (up to 15 years with the company) are really screwed. Their only options are to wait for recall, try for a regional (where they'll be junior F/O's), go to frac jets or corporate, or change careers. I guess those are the same options for any furloughee really.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Yup, it doesn't carry over.

If a United 747 captain gets hired at Skywest, he'll be a bottom-of-the-list Brasilia FO making first year pay sitting reserve.

Remember, pilots are one of the only employee groups that are literally married to the airline.
 

reaperman

Well-Known Member
A few reasons some pilots get paid so well:
1. same reason a state lottery winner gets millions of dollars for a $1 ticket.
2. same reason a pro football player gets $200 Grand for playing thirty some minutes of football every Sunday afternoon.
3. same reason a land surveyor gets $500 to put a signature on a recorded survey.

The details are left as an exercise.
 

Virusss

New Member
Well that sounds kinda harsh. But what about if you fly for the air force or navy until you retire then go and start flying for an airline. My dad said "work for the airforce (about 10 years) retire and then after get a job with an airline you will have a higher starting salary."

Is that tru?
 

A300Capt

Freight Dawg
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
My dad said "work for the airforce (about 10 years) retire and then after get a job with an airline you will have a higher starting salary."


[/ QUOTE ]

Your past experience and length of time in the military has absolutely nothing to do with your starting salary at an airline.

Everyone, from the young civilain CFI to the retired AirForce General, starts at the same hourly rate when hired at an airline. From there, years in service and seat assignment (dictated by seniority) determines salary.
 

farwellbooth

Well-Known Member
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
My dad said "work for the airforce (about 10 years) retire and then after get a job with an airline you will have a higher starting salary."


[/ QUOTE ]

There could be some truth to this. A pilot coming out of the Air Force may be able to "skip" the regional years and have one's income start higher and increase faster. Secondly, depending on the market they may have an edge in getting hired with some of the majors. However, don't join the military solely for these reasons.
 

davetheflyer

New Member
Military pilots may have an opportunity to go directly to the majors, but they will probably have less time than a pilot who has flown for the regionals (or even instructed). I knew a USMC Harrier pilot. After I instructed for a couple of years, I had about 1500 hours to his 800 (and we started about the same time).

Also, I have heard rumors that ALPA may try to push a national seniority list in the next couple of years.
 

flyguy

Well-Known Member
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
Also, I have heard rumors that ALPA may try to push a national seniority list in the next couple of years.

[/ QUOTE ]
Really? How would that work? Would it caryover from any regional to any major? Thatwill make things interresting. We'll be bidding on jobs.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
I really don't see a national seniority list ever coming to fruition. Because you'd see the senior guys moving to the highest paying airlines, and then shifting to the airline with the biggest/best deal. Lots of training costs because I'm qualified to fly the MD-88, but I am legally able to fly American's Super-80's, but I've got to be retained in their procedures and operations, etc.

I dunno, it seems like an "ok" idea to start with, but implementation is a whole other story.
 

davetheflyer

New Member
I guess it has pros and cons. Most people that I have heard talk about the national list are against it though.

I mean if you are furloughed from one line, you could concievably interview, be hired and trained and displace even senior pilots from another company.

I think that it came up as a response to the scope issues between the regionals and majors.
 

flyguy

Well-Known Member
But how would it work? Would you get a spot on the senority list on the date of hire at a 121 carrier? At a major airline? What if you quit to persue another career? Would you be able to get back in the game after waiting long enough to bid on a 777 captains slot, or would you give up your senority number when you leave?
 

davetheflyer

New Member
All good questions that I don't have an answer for. I think that the proponents of the national list are mostly senior regional captains of the same ilk that formed the RJDC. I really don't know anything else about it.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
There's no way. Because if my pal Joe (a Delta pilot), who got furloughed two months ago, would go displace a more junior United pilot, thus triggering UAL to furlough a pilot. That UAL pilot who got furloughed would go displace a more junior Northwest pilot, and so on and so on.
 
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