Challenger overdue in Mexico

Autothrust Blue

"Duuuuuude."
he's laughing because you assumed that because he got hired, that he can fly
short hills were a hangar or two over from me many moons ago. from what other corporate pilots on the field mentioned, their hiring is probably not the best metric to judge pilot skill
Most hiring processes don't bother to assess that, other than the normal regulatory background.
 

GypsyPilot

Well-Known Member
A pilot crewmember who is not allowed to, and cannot, fly the airplane, is not a pilot crewmember. He is a useless appendage and probably more of a hindrance or hazard than an assistance (and moreover, not worth his own weight). To hell with (especially) the insurance companies and the Fuzz for allowing and endorsing such a patently ridiculous set of circumstances.


Thing of it is, we're only talking about a few degrees of spoiler deflection at most; any larger and you run into nifty aerodynamic issues like Vls (Airbus) or Vsw-or-whatever-it-is-on-the-175 running into Mmo. Largely the same issue on a non-envelope-protected aircraft, sans the envelope protection, as well.

I'll take a few knots of overspeed (and the possible activation of high speed protection, and having to write it up - big whoop) any day than putting the boards out, even a few degrees, in wave.
That’s a fair point, and I would say I definitely agree with you. Thanks for your perspective on it!
 

Autothrust Blue

"Duuuuuude."
That’s a fair point, and I would say I definitely agree with you. Thanks for your perspective on it!
There was an EM7 LCA at the Whiz that was encouraging this and being an LCA people nodded and went "yup yup sounds good boss"; it belied a lack of understanding of how envelope protection works, and how the characteristic speeds were computed, and, you know...aerodynamics.
 

BEEF SUPREME

Well-Known Member
What if I told you, people at where you used to work passed sim and then got a gratuitous amount of IOE?
Oh yeah I met one. They were a stay at home parent for 10 years. Got back into the game and needed extra help. Everyone at the training center was at the hotel being supportive the night before the final check ride. I was really impressed with that kind of support. Of course I felt a lot of empathy as I had taken a year away from aviation to be a stay at home dad myself.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
But that FO had been hired at Short Hills Aviation. So how the heck can that be the case if he can’t even fly? And the CA cussing literally every other word. How does someone like that make it in aviation? If someone like that worked for me, they wouldn’t be for long. And no 121 airline would put up with that either.
Just down the street from your alma mater, someone dropped the door of a Challenger 601 onto a golf course (ERA12LA356). The pilot that secured the door prior to take off only received in-house SIC training. There are a few good 135 operators, and then there are a million others.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Just down the street from your alma mater, someone dropped the door of a Challenger 601 onto a golf course (ERA12LA356). The pilot that secured the door prior to take off only received in-house SIC training. There are a few good 135 operators, and then there are a million others.
Alma mater was Ann Arbor, Michigan. I had to google that accident number in the NTSB website because I don't ever recall a Challenger jet in Michigan losing its door on takeoff. We weren't talking about shady operators in Florida, but okay.
 

sweeps

Undercarriage Acuator
Just down the street from your alma mater, someone dropped the door of a Challenger 601 onto a golf course (ERA12LA356). The pilot that secured the door prior to take off only received in-house SIC training. There are a few good 135 operators, and then there are a million others.
Does it matter where he was trained? CAE or Flight Safety never showed me how to operate a door. Learned that on the airplane.
 
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