CFII ride in a twin

Houston

Well-Known Member
I think you might run into a problem doing that. Examiners have Letters of Authority (LOA) for what they are authorized to do. When it comes to AMEL aircraft, the DPEs have to have each type listed. They have to give five rides in type per year to renew. They have to take a check ride in type every other year. So, the net result is that the typical DPE only has a couple authorized types if they even have AMEL at all. So, you might find that your list of examiners who are authorized to give the check in the type of AMEL you are flying is a very short list.

Be sure to read the note in Area IX of the PTS. It changes the game for AMEL.
 

Inverted25

Well-Known Member
I think you might run into a problem doing that. Examiners have Letters of Authority (LOA) for what they are authorized to do. When it comes to AMEL aircraft, the DPEs have to have each type listed. They have to give five rides in type per year to renew. They have to take a check ride in type every other year. So, the net result is that the typical DPE only has a couple authorized types if they even have AMEL at all. So, you might find that your list of examiners who are authorized to give the check in the type of AMEL you are flying is a very short list.

Be sure to read the note in Area IX of the PTS. It changes the game for AMEL.
The ride is not for me. It's for a CFI at our school. It was the DPE who does all our checkrides idea. He said he could do both in the apache. He needs 14 hours to meet the 15 PIC requirement for the MEI so he figured he could knock the CFII and MEI training in that 14 hours
 

KDoersom

Well-Known Member
I did it that way in an Aztec. Wasn't a big deal at all. Since you have to do approaches for the MEI anyway. Just need two 8710. On for the CFII and one for the MEI. Shouldn't be to hard to find an examiner. And if you can't take it with the Friendly Aviation Administration.
 

Houston

Well-Known Member
Shouldn't be to hard to find an examiner. And if you can't take it with the Friendly Aviation Administration.
Actually, there is a potential for some savings there. If there aren't any DPEs with that authority, it justifies having the check done by an inspector. Although, in this case, it sounds like they do have a DPE who has that authority and is readily available.
 

MD-11Loader

Well-Known Member
Yup, but I also did my initial CFI in a twin. The II was a fairly easy ride. Went under the hood 500' above the airport. Flew to the AHN VOR, then did the VOR/DME A into WDR with the Arc, examiner gave me a modified missed approach procedure. Prior to entering the hold he failed my left engine, did the engine out procedure and he gave it back to me, then I entered the hold. I then did the GPS 31 into WDR, modified missed approach again. He vectored me to intercept the ILS 25 into LZU, where he failed my engine before glide slope intercept. All in all it was an amazingly simple ride. 1.2 hours total time.
 

Inverted25

Well-Known Member
Yup, but I also did my initial CFI in a twin. The II was a fairly easy ride. Went under the hood 500' above the airport. Flew to the AHN VOR, then did the VOR/DME A into WDR with the Arc, examiner gave me a modified missed approach procedure. Prior to entering the hold he failed my left engine, did the engine out procedure and he gave it back to me, then I entered the hold. I then did the GPS 31 into WDR, modified missed approach again. He vectored me to intercept the ILS 25 into LZU, where he failed my engine before glide slope intercept. All in all it was an amazingly simple ride. 1.2 hours total time.
Thanks for the write up. I was wondering if you did it in a twin they would do engine out procedures
 

MD-11Loader

Well-Known Member
It shouldn't be too big of a deal. At this point you should have your engine out flows down and be able to do it from muscle memory. My best landings in the twin seems to be my single engine landings, not sure why. Maybe because I have to get it right.
 
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