Cessna Caravan Question

Parabellum

New Member
Is the Caravan certified for single pilot ops or does it require two pilots? The reason I ask is because I notice (at least from photos) that is has two sets of instruments, one on each front seat. If its a single pilot plane, why's there a need for the other set of instruments?
 

xdashdriver

Well-Known Member
Paul,

Although the Caravan is certified for single-pilot operations, Cessna no doubt thought that some operators would want to fly it with two pilots, hence they provided the flexbility of flying it one or two pilots by putting in an extra set of instruments. Most aircraft except the piston singles and very light twins (due to lack of panel space more than anything else) will have at least a basic set of instruments on the co-pilot side. A lot of aircraft manufacturers will offer co-pilot instruments either standard or as an option.

Ray
 

Parabellum

New Member
Hmm, interesting... Why exactly would an operator want to fly a single-pilot op certified aircraft with two pilots? Doesn't sound very cost effective to me (but a benefit to pilots looking for jobs I suppose). Does this mean that a copilot on a Caravan could log SIC time, or would he simply be considered a passenger?
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
. Why exactly would an operator want to fly a single-pilot op certified aircraft with two pilots? Doesn't sound very cost effective to me (but a benefit to pilots looking for jobs I suppose). Does this mean that a copilot on a Caravan could log SIC time, or would he simply be considered a passenger?



[/ QUOTE ]

The right seater could always work for free.
 

Buzo

Well-Known Member
There are a few companies up in Alaska that operate Caravans as a two pilot airplane. It is required by there insurance and in there ops specs. The co-pilots do log it as SIC time. Most operators in Alaska operate single pilot airplanes with co-pilots because they couldn't get insurance any other way. The nice part is it allows low time pilots to get jobs. The pay isn't great, but you do get paid.

One operator hires 250 hour commercial pilots to fly as caravan co-pilots.
 

xdashdriver

Well-Known Member
Paul,

I fly a Cessna 414 and Kingair B100, both certified for single-pilot operations. Sometimes we fly single pilot, sometimes we don't. It all depends on what the customer wants, or what his insurance company dictates. For example, when we're flying the officers of one of the local banks, the bank's insurance company requires that there be two pilots on board. Other people just prefer that there are two pilots, it makes them feel safer. Additionally, sometimes it isn't passenger's insurance company, it's the operator's insurance company. Many aircraft insurance companies are now requiring that aircraft such as Kingairs are operated with 2 pilots, especially when used for charter.

As for logging SIC the regulations only permit logging SIC when required by the type certificate of the aircraft, or the operations under which the flight is conducted. For example, an aircraft operated under Part 135, that has ten seats or more, MUST have two pilots, per the regulations. If you were flying a Kingair 350, which is a single-pilot airplane, on charter, you would be allowed to log SIC as co-pilot because the regulations require it for that operation.

Other than that you may not log SIC.

Ray
 

Buzo

Well-Known Member
The new Subpart K of part 91 will open up logging SIC for single pilot airplanes operated by fractionals and corporations.
 

xdashdriver

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
The new Subpart K of part 91 will open up logging SIC for single pilot airplanes operated by fractionals and corporations.

[/ QUOTE ]

About time too. Since GA is regulated mainly by the insurance companies and not the FAA, it's about time they allowed SIC-logging for legitimate two-pilot operations on single-pilot airplanes.

Ray
 

flycanuck

New Member
Caravans can easily be piloted by one person. And since were talking about them I would like to say that Caravans Kick Ass!
 

Buzo

Well-Known Member
Just an add-on, if the caravan is being operated carrying passengers 135 IFR without an auto pilot there has to be two pilots.
 

xdashdriver

Well-Known Member
If we're getting REALLY technical, then even if does have an autopilot it still needs to be flown with two pilots under IFR Part 135 (carrying passengers in an aircraft with a passenger seating configuration of fewer than 10 seats), unless it is a 3-axis autopilot, AND the certificate holder can demonstrate that operations can be conducted safely without a second-in-command (i.e. on the checkride), AND the appropriate operations specifications authorizing the use of such an autopilot are issued.



Ray
 

newty

New Member
Hey Buzo
mind telling me which company is hiring 250tt commercial pilots as sic in caravans. I want the Job but I haven't found it.
 

Athena

New Member
Is there enough work in AK that it is something i should be researching for when I graduate as a low hour pilot?
 

aviator

New Member
I flew as a passenger on an airline in Honduras that flys caravans with two pilots, it was called something like Isle airline....
The departure procedure from Utilia (Bay island) to La Cieba consisted of intiating a 45 degree steep turn (with one main still on the runway) followed by a series of 3 low passes of the captains girlfriends house in town, all below 100 ft AGL and around 150 knots at 530 AM.

Bunch of cowboys down there.........
 
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