Cessna 152 rental/instruction rates?

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
What are you guys paying? I have a nice 152 aerobat with a Garmin GNS430 IFR GPS/comm. It's $59/hr and $35 for instruction. Wondering how those rates compare with other parts of the USA.

I'm setting it up so freelance CFI's can use the plane. The owner of the building needs 15%, so CFI's can take home about $30/hr. Any other freelancers out there care to mention what they charge for instruction per hour?
 

Alchemy

Partner, Ally, Friend
The flying club here rents their 152 for $55/hr, but they're non profit and I'm not sure if it's IFR equipped or not. No GPS on this one.



 

JaceTheAce

Well-Known Member
I found a 152 with upgraded avionics that rents for $49 wet here in Sacramento, CA. There's also a place in San Diego that rents for $49 wet too... This is the cheapest I've found. Most other places are around $60-65 in this area.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
The FBO where I got my private = C152 - no GPS - "standard" avionics = $65/hr.

Instruction was $35/hr.

The FBO where I am now = C150 - no GPS - "frigged up" avionics where the "six pack" got scattered to hell and back - $45/hr.

Instruction is $26/hr.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
I'd say you can raise it a bit more; around here 152s go from 60ish all the way up to 80, and that's for a basic airplane with bare bones equipment. It sounds like you've got a solid 152 with great avionics.

However if you want to make it readily available to younger students, I'd say keep it where it's at
 

pavelump

Well-Known Member
I pay $25/hr dry, but I know the owner. He's my boss!


A 430 in a C-152? Isn't that system more expensive than the airplane? j/k


Dave
 

darrenf

resident denizen
[ QUOTE ]
What are you guys paying? I have a nice 152 aerobat with a Garmin GNS430 IFR GPS/comm.


[/ QUOTE ]

What, no Autopilot?????? HSI???
 

sbe

Well-Known Member
I've definitely found a diamond in the rough, but I pay $48 on block time (regular is $54/hr) on an IFR C150. Has a pretty darn new Apollo radio stack in it - the "slim line" series with the IFR GPS to boot (can't remember the exact model off the top of my head). This is at an uncontrolled field just north of town. At my flight school (at a Class D field) we had a C152 that had a Garmin GPS 150XL in it that was $55/hr. It sold just before I started my training, though.

Instruction at both fields runs in the $30-35 range.
 

I_Money

Moderator
$65-70 aircraft $30-35 instruction standard around here. In the UK $210 aircraft and instruction.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the responses. Sounds like my price is fair.

SkyGuyEd...I actually thought $59 was a bit on the high side but the building owner is taking 15%, so I had to ask that. This is more than fair cause I'll have a huge area for a classroom or whatever and can advertise out of his pilot supply shop. I don't think I could ask a higher rate because the only competition on the airport is running N model 172's at $69/hr.

Pavelump...I think I'll have about 7K into the 430, installed, when all is said and done. Hopefully, it will never break.....
 

farwellbooth

Well-Known Member
$48 wet
$30 instruction (a couple less experienced guys charge $25)

5 of the 6 have GPS

No way would I want to fly an "IFR equipped" 152 in the Northwest.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
I don't think there is anything wrong with training IFR in a 152....some actual in controlled conditions, too. I wouldn't take off from Spokane in the winter in one and head for Portland, that's for sure. My goal is to have a nice 152 available, with an IFR approach approved GPS, for the cheapest possible price. Between my plane and the ground trainers, I'll be able to do an IFR rating for about 3K.
 

farwellbooth

Well-Known Member
I started my IR this last winter and definitely would not want to be in a 152. I've had ice on at least a third of my lessons. On a good day I can get 500 fpm with instructor in a 152. Add a little ice and a downdraft inside a cloud in a 152, not my idea of fun. I suppose it could be done...

I've been hammered VFR in a 152 flying up your way VFR, high pressure sittin west of the Cascades, freakin' thing bounces around like mad. No power to climb out of it. And that's when I can see the ground, often above me. I can get a 172 for $68 wet, to me the extra $20 is worth it.

I'd be careful trying to save so much money with the ground training etc. I don't have unlimited funds either but as you know it's a whole nother ball game in the air in actual.
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
How much horsepower does your aerobat have? 150 HP? If it does have 150 HP, training in that would be mhuch better than the 100 HP 150's. Better climb rate and be able to handle the up and down drafts a little better.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
I'm spending 3K on the Sparrowhawk prop mod. It should give me 115 hp. I could do the high compression pistons, too, and I'd get 125hp. They say the full mod will perform the same as a 172. Mine will have a climb prop, too, will sacrifice cruise speed for climb performance in a trainer any day.

I've been a CFII since 1982 and signed off about 40 instrument ratings...have had good luck using ground trainers for about 10 of the 40 hours. Am looking at getting a computer based PCATD and hope they will prove useful for 10 hours, do 10 hours in my ATC610, and the rest in the plane.

Some guys can't fit into a 152 and/or just like a bigger plane and are willing to pay extra....whatever floats your boat...
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
I did 100% of my IFR training in a 152; and I had a blast.

I saved a very decent amount of money doing it that way; which is good because it was really the only way to do it with what I make...

The training was fantastic, and we definately sought out actual as much as we could. It does get bumpy but IMHO 152s are built very strongly, and the point is training: if you get the experience of being rocked in a 152; the bumps won't feel so bad by the time you 'move up' to the 172.

I definately see where you guys are coming from regarding icing and climb performance. Basically if there is any chance of the freezing level getting near the cruise altitude we don't go, which isn't too hard even in winter.

I should mention two distinct memories of my training: having to pull the power waaaaayyy back, and pitching down just to maintain altitude. The updraft was around 1400fpm which would do the same thing to any plane; just that the 152 responds to it faster. When you go up... you go up. The other time was having full power at Vy and barely hanging on to altitude. We were VFR and definately in a downdraft. Got out of it in 30 sec or so and were on our way.

The other consideration is the fact that you don't have much airspeed to play with during cruise. It actually cruises below Va, which is nice sometimes, but if you pull the carb head and go full power you'll only get 75-80kts, or about 10kts more than Vy. Get some ice and you're descending, no question about it.

As for overall climb performance... it wasn't so bad. On one flight we went up to 9500' and were climbing at 300-400fpm, and every one of our flights was right up at max gross (this was with a 110hp stock 152).
 

mastermags

Well-Known Member *giggity*
[ QUOTE ]
What are you guys paying? I have a nice 152 aerobat with a Garmin GNS430 IFR GPS/comm. It's $59/hr and $35 for instruction. Wondering how those rates compare with other parts of the USA.

[/ QUOTE ]

Wow, that sounds like a killer deal.
 

Alchemy

Partner, Ally, Friend
I also don't see anything wrong with doing the instrument in an aircraft with bare bones avionics such as most 152's, although it sounds like DE727's plane will be the Cadillac of 152's. Personally I did mine in a 172 since I'm a pretty big guy, but there was no DME, GPS, HSI, and it had the old cessna nav/com radios.

When I tranistioned to shooting approaches in airplanes with an HSI, GPS, and DME everything seemed really really easy, because I earned my rating in an airplane where you had to know other methods for situational awarness and had to have more instruments in the scan.
 

BlueStreak

New Member
I'm in an FBO flight club at Dodgen Aircraft in Allegan, MI. They have some excellent rates on aircraft once you join. For the 152's you join the club by making a one time $500 payment. You then pay a $30 per month membership fee. The rental rate (wet) on the 152 is $32 per hour! And they have three available to you. Overall, the FBO club is great. I worked my way up to joining the Seneca club and will be able to pay $119 per hour (wet) when I do the multi. Currently I am paying $61 per hour for the Arrow. It has really helped me save a lot of money since I have joined. If you do the math you will save money as long as you fly 45 hours or more per year, then the second year can save you something like $585 according to the website. Definately worth looking into if you live in the Southwest Michigan area. The planes are in good condition and there are plenty to choose from....see for yourself.

Dodgen Aircraft

Happy Flying!
 

dakovich

Well-Known Member
my FBO was $66 for a 152 aerobat. $35 for instruction

our 172RG goes for $140 dual (105 solo), and has a sweet full apollo stack in it with the multi function display. whats everyone else paying for RG's?
 
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