Certification Question

BJ

Well-Known Member
Just a question for the masses regarding ratings and certifications...I know there's a lot of experience and military out there who may have an answer for me so that the FSDO can't lead me in the wrong direction. After Air Force pilot training, our class took the FAA test and got certified with our Multi-Engine (centerline thrust), Commercial, Instrument license. My question is since I didn't have a private pilot's license (single-engine), what do I need to do to get that single-engine license? I guess more specifically, if someone has a PPL and tests for a multi-engine commercial, does there single-engine become "commercial" as well? Any info would be great. Since I haven't flown civilian in a long time and want to get back in the air for relaxation, I'm wondering if I have to fly and ground eval to commercial standards or not.

Thanks,

-BJ
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
Unfortunately, if you have a multi-engine, centerline only commercial certificate then you only have the right to fly a multi-engine, centerline thrust aircraft. Or, essentailly a C-336/7 or the new Adams Carbon Aero (I can't really think of anyother centerline aircraft).
The FAA does not grant "backwards compatability" in the multi-comm department - or really any other rating/certificate. Or, in otherwords you do not have single engine privliges because you hold a multi-comm. And, unfortunately, beacause your multi certificate is centerline restricted you can't fly a "traditional" twin like a Seminole, 310 etc. until that restriction is removed via a ride with your local, neighborhood DPE.

But, to get the centerline restriction removed or get the single engine priviledges all you need to do is take a quick ride with a DPE or the FAA to get it removed. However removig it will still limit you to ME only aircraft. For SE priviliges you'll need to do a full blown checkride at, your choice, of either the private or commercial level. But because it'll be an add-on it won't be too painful (not that you would have much trouble with it anyway!).

However, I'm sure there are some Military Equivalancy issues or concerns that come into play and I'd have no idea on those.

Dunno, I don't think I laid that out too well but it's midnight and I'm tired ...

 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
. My question is since I didn't have a private pilot's license (single-engine), what do I need to do to get that single-engine license? I guess more specifically, if someone has a PPL and tests for a multi-engine commercial, does there single-engine become "commercial" as well? Any info would be great. .

Thanks,

-BJ


[/ QUOTE ]

Since you have a Commercial Certificate already, all you need to do is take a single-engine checkride to Commercial standards to then have a Comm ASMEL; or if you take it to Private standards, you'll have a Comm AMEL/Pvt ASEL certificate.

Unfortunately, they don't "crossover". If you take the Commercial for multi-engine, your single-engine doesn't "follow along" and vice-versa. Hence why I have an ATP AMEL with Commercial priviliges ASEL.

MD
 

BJ

Well-Known Member
Mike,

Then how come guys coming out of training were getting signed off as single-engine commercial? Is that just lucky getting a good examiner? It seems like some people got it signed off and some didn't. Now if you take a PPL exam, can the examiner not go into commercial GK on the ground eval?

-BJ
 

davetheflyer

New Member
All you need to do is take a checkride with a designated examiner (DE) for a single-engine add-on rating. Get a copy of the Private Pilot Practical Test Standards (PTS-your friendly neighborhood CFI should have one). In the front there is a chart that shows which tasks are required for issuance of a PSEL if you already hold a PMEL.

I did a CSEL license for a former C-141 pilot a few years ago. At the time, it took basically the same requirements for the commercial as it would have for a private.

Good luck!
 
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