Careers Outside of Dispatch & Aviation

NTDX

Well-Known Member
I was wondering if anyone had any insight or recommendations for careers outside of dispatch and aviation where having dispatch experience is looked upon favorably.

Bonus points if the pay isn’t crap.
 

DispatchDan

Well-Known Member
I was wondering if anyone had any insight or recommendations for careers outside of dispatch and aviation where having dispatch experience is looked upon favorably.

Bonus points if the pay isn’t crap.
I truly doubt that you’re gonna find any. Outside of dispatchers, even within the aviation industry, people are clueless to what dispatchers do.
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
I have heard of bus dispatchers that work for Greyhound. There are also train dispatchers, and I have heard a lot of them got hired with aircraft dispatcher licenses. Another related job is pipeline dispatchers for oil companies. A lot of people I worked with in my last shop transitioned over to doing that, the pay was supposedly very good. Some seemed to do very well at it (and are still employed in that field) and others did not. (I know of one person who got fired and another who quit and went back to aircraft dispatching.) The one friend I had that tried train dispatching didn't like it very much and quit before she got signed off - evidently it was not a very good work schedule. Another co-worker quit and did that for a while, I guess got tired of it and got re-hired as a dispatcher at my current shop.

With the current contracts, benefits (including travel and jumpseat benefits) and work rules at majors, I personally can't think of a better job to have in terms of QOL and pay right now. Yes, I know doctors can make more money but they have brutal schedules at times. Financial industry jobs may also pay better but also have long hours and lots of stress. I may be prejudiced because I like my job. For me, it's a perfect fit for my interests and personality. (Flying might be better in terms of pay if that's your thing - it isn't mine, but I know a lot of people love flying.) Of course, if you want to live in a particular region that doesn't have a major headquartered there, then it may be worth checking out some of those other jobs. Just remember though, the grass is NOT always greener in the other industry.
 

Flagship_dxer

Legacy Airline Dispatcher
As a dispatcher, if you want to try a different career, it is probably best to become an overtime wh0re and save up enough money to get a more marketable college degree or another trade certificate.

You can go the rail dispatching route but like the airlines you are limited in where and with who you can do that with. Plus it also is a limited use skill set.
 

CF34-3B1

Well-Known Member
Save up doubletime money... once you have about 300k saved up go the medical route. Attention to detail still counts there plus it pays more. That’s what my back up plan is anyway...
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
What kind of education do you have? I tangentially work with a logistics guy who's doing pretty well for himself.
 

QXDX

Well-Known Member
I was wondering if anyone had any insight or recommendations for careers outside of dispatch and aviation where having dispatch experience is looked upon favorably.

Bonus points if the pay isn’t crap.
Any transportation company, or company with a transportation department, needs people with your logistics skills. I doubt that the pay is much different though.
 

Stanimal

Well-Known Member
I worked at Union Pacific as a conductor and that is where I realized 2 things:

1. working for the railroad was the worst job I ever had, no matter what the pay is
2. ANYTHING is better than this.. I left the RR for dispatch school (with no intentions of ever coming back to RR industry either as train crew or dispatcher there)

*the RR will OWN you and your life. The saying in the RR is "they don’t pay you for what you do, they pay you for the inconvenience they impose on your life.” (what little of it you might have left)

To this day I still swear by this about the RR, “Worst job I ever had!”
 

kacampbell

Well-Known Member
Getting out of dispatch AND aviation the above options are viable. Another option would be working for a vendor for aviation products - think Jeppesen, Sabre, Navblue, FlightAware, etc. They are always looking for people to join their product teams that have real world experience either using their products or just being in the industry in general. You could look into software development, marketing, product management, project management, etc - it doesnt get you completely out of aviation but out of dispatching if thats what youre looking for.
 

A-9er

Well-Known Member
A guy I worked with (was in my class) found a job as a registrar at a local hospital. He improved his computer and typing skills, plus got a lot of practice interacting with different people. The registrar the person who checks you in to the hospital. DX helps you learn and/or improve not only computer skills; it helps when applying for customer service type jobs too. Think about what you do during a shift. You'll talk to different station to give them pax and bag limits; you'll talk to ATC for reroutes or aircraft swaps; you'll talk to pilots; you'll talk with crew scheduling and MX control in your SOC. IOW, you'll interact with a LOT of different people. So any job involving interaction and talking to people would be worth a look.

That is to say that DX experience gives one transferable skills. Attention to detail is a requirement for many different jobs. Computer and typing skills are a must at many. Interpersonal and communications skills are used by DXers, and they're certainly transferable skills as well; that'll open many doors in and out of aviation.
 
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