Career change

Bamaaviator

Well-Known Member
#45
Great thread going here. I'm 'sorta' late to the game of professional aviation. I'm 29, people tell me "you're still very young, don't worry." I just wish I would have jumped on the band wagon sooner. I think I hesitated a lot a few years back though when the industry was still in the tank, and everybody I talked to didn't recommend the career.

I'm also looking at the regionals as well. What are typical schedules like for new hires? How much time at home? I know the answer 'varies,' but can any of you regional guys/gals chime in on this?
 

Vyse

BirchJet CA
#46
Regarding "what type of CFI position should I get", if you do go that route, I would recommend a 141 school where you can be assigned students- preferably career-minded students who have already paid for their training- and not have to worry about recruiting your own students. The 141 environment also offers a base of standardization that will help you get used to an airline environment. That's the fastest way to log time as a CFI.
 

fletchersteel

Well-Known Member
#47
Would the CFI 141 route gain more hours typically than finding a flying gig like survey or the likes? I know it’s highly dependent on weather and other factors, but I’m feeling behind the ball and need to “catch up” so to speak.
 

BrettInLJ

Well-Known Member
#48
Would the CFI 141 route gain more hours typically than finding a flying gig like survey or the likes? I know it’s highly dependent on weather and other factors, but I’m feeling behind the ball and need to “catch up” so to speak.
If you go to the right 141 program. I moved to Texas from California years ago to get my CFI certs at a particular school that I found out about on JC. Luckily I was hired and there was definitely a lot of flying.
 

Nihon_Ni

Well-Known Member
#53
Unfortunately, I have not made any retirement funds, and my time to let it grow is behind me. I’ve always worked and never had enough to save.
One word of advice -- no matter what you decide to do about a future career, you have to change your thinking with regard to saving. You have to get into the habit of paying yourself first and living on the rest or no matter how much you make you'll never have enough to save. I know it doesn't seem like it from your current perspective, but shifting your mentality now will be the best thing for your future.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
#54
One word of advice -- no matter what you decide to do about a future career, you have to change your thinking with regard to saving. You have to get into the habit of paying yourself first and living on the rest or no matter how much you make you'll never have enough to save. I know it doesn't seem like it from your current perspective, but shifting your mentality now will be the best thing for your future.
This. So much this.
 

bucksmith

Did you lock the doors?
#55
Would the CFI 141 route gain more hours typically than finding a flying gig like survey or the likes? I know it’s highly dependent on weather and other factors, but I’m feeling behind the ball and need to “catch up” so to speak.
It will be better experience (master a craft by teaching it...) and not everyone puts a preference on hiring former CFI's, but some do. The trick is, in addition to loving flying, you also have to enjoy teaching. Otherwise, you'll be unhappy and be doing a disservice to people spending a LOT of money. No demerits for admitting you wouldn't enjoy teaching, the other ways to build time also have some very valuable aspects to developing yourself into a fine aviator.
I've flown with survey guys that could hustle their way around a FBO like no other and banner towers that weren't afraid of anything!
 

coks

Well-Known Member
#56
Would the CFI 141 route gain more hours typically than finding a flying gig like survey or the likes? I know it’s highly dependent on weather and other factors, but I’m feeling behind the ball and need to “catch up” so to speak.
I work at a large flight school in Arizona, its teaching foreign students but most instructors will be here for 12-18 months (usually closer to the 12 month area) before reaching their ATP hours and going to the regionals, its probably the fastest way to get your hours with 100-110 hours per month under the right conditions. There are a handful of large flight schools around the US that offer this kind of work environment, 100 hours/month, so the opportunity is there to get your hours fast with that kind of work.
 
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