Caravan.....not even sure how this happened

knot4u

Repeat Offender
I had a brake fail during a landing during PPL training, put a wheel in the dirt at KWHP. Certainly got my attention, the only reason I was on the brakes was because we were doing short field landings, I preferred letting the airplane just run out of energy.
 

Stryker172

Well-Known Member
How about

"got distracted and never slowed down on the descent, crossed the threshold at about 140, floated about 4000' down the runway, and locked up the brakes and full reverse trying to get stopped."

I know a guy who came way too close to running off the end of the runway in a 208 in that exact scenario.






Everyone please do yourself a favor and go around if you're not on a stable approach. The laws of physics don't care that you think you're a salty freight dog.
Is Jerry flying this?
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
“A Mokulele captain told officials that the first officer was flying the Cessna 208B plane at the time. The captain said the first officer came in a little too fast and touched down about halfway down the runway. The first officer reportedly put the propellers into reverse, but the plane did not slow down.”





Yeah, those damn FOs!
 

Acrofox

All dragon~
So for those of you who haven't flown a Caravan, let me describe how hard this is.

The van, fully loaded, can do 160 to short final, say the end of an ALSF II... pull the power back, pitch up, fwaaaank on the prop, and be in flap range by, say, the middle bars on a MALSR... about a thousand feet from the threshold. From there, it's like you have dive brakes out, and you can just kinda drop out of the sky, touch down on the numbers and be off in a thousand feet and change, without touching the brakes or using reverse.

This accident reminds me of this video:


'Cause it takes skill.

(NB. Fly the plane you're in. Fly a caravan like a caravan, fly a jet like a jet. Bleh.)

-Fox
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
So for those of you who haven't flown a Caravan, let me describe how hard this is.

The van, fully loaded, can do 160 to short final, say the end of an ALSF II... pull the power back, pitch up, fwaaaank on the prop, and be in flap range by, say, the middle bars on a MALSR... about a thousand feet from the threshold. From there, it's like you have dive brakes out, and you can just kinda drop out of the sky, touch down on the numbers and be off in a thousand feet and change, without touching the brakes or using reverse.

This accident reminds me of this video:


'Cause it takes skill.

(NB. Fly the plane you're in. Fly a caravan like a caravan, fly a jet like a jet. Bleh.)

-Fox
You talking regular van
They had something special
The first officer reportedly put the propellers into reverse, but the plane did not slow down.
 

Skåning

Well-Known Member
So for those of you who haven't flown a Caravan, let me describe how hard this is.

The van, fully loaded, can do 160 to short final, say the end of an ALSF II... pull the power back, pitch up, fwaaaank on the prop, and be in flap range by, say, the middle bars on a MALSR... about a thousand feet from the threshold. From there, it's like you have dive brakes out, and you can just kinda drop out of the sky, touch down on the numbers and be off in a thousand feet and change, without touching the brakes or using reverse.

This accident reminds me of this video:


'Cause it takes skill.

(NB. Fly the plane you're in. Fly a caravan like a caravan, fly a jet like a jet. Bleh.)

-Fox
Well that car was a Skoda, there’s ur problem!
 
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