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Canada & Vancouver, BC requirements & Job Market

Discussion in 'Expatriate Aviation' started by WS, Nov 1, 2015.

  1. WS

    WS Well-Known Member

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    I lived in BC many moons ago, and since my wife is dual citizen and would like to move back to Canada at some point, I'm beginning the process of regaining my permanent resident status and working in Canada as a pilot.

    I have researched the process for most of this but have a couple specific questions. The Air Canada Jazz site states this requirement: "All applicants shall be licensed by Transport Canada to act as First Officers on 705 category aircraft." Is this an additional requirement to having a Canadian ATP? Not sure what this means and haven't been able to find much info on it.

    Second, how is the job market compared to the US, and how difficult would it be to get based in Vancouver at a place like Air Canada Jazz?

    I will be knocking out the ATP in the US this spring, and probably start the process to convert it to the Canada equivalent shortly thereafter. I've worked as a CFI/II/MEI for a few years and have some 135 cargo experience, but would like to move on to a regional gig, so I'm essentially starting at the bottom. Thanks for your input!
     
  2. cda_to_usa

    cda_to_usa Well-Known Member

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    Vancouver would be tough to hold with Jazz, I believe most guys were recently bumped to Calgary. New hires at Jazz make $32,000 Canadian now which is about $25,000 USD. Things have changed significantly over the last few years. There's lots happening in Toronto with Sky Regional and Georgian, direct entry Captains seats are a possibility and upgrades at those two companies will be less than two years.
    ATP is all you need or Commercial with IATRA exam written. Lot's of non ATP 1200 hour guys being hired and times are dropping. Lots of hiring now.
     
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  3. cda_to_usa

    cda_to_usa Well-Known Member

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    Maybe take a look at Westjet Encore.
     
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  4. WS

    WS Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info. So that blurb I quoted above about being licensed to act as a first officer is essentially just referring to the appropriate commercial or ATP license then?
     
  5. cda_to_usa

    cda_to_usa Well-Known Member

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    Yep, you should be able to convert your FAA commercial to a Canadian commercial,and then write an additional exam called the IATRA which allows you to fly right seat at an airline. No need for the ATP immediately.
     
  6. WS

    WS Well-Known Member

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    Cool, thanks. Well, the ATP was something I was planning on getting soon anyway, and my understanding is that it is a shorter process to convert ATP rather than the Commercial and instrument since it only needs to be done once, so that's the route that I'm probably going to go.
     
  7. Zondaracer

    Zondaracer Well-Known Member

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    To convert from the FAA to TC, it's just a knowledge test and paperwork shuffle.

    From another forum:

    "Made the conversion last spring from FAA ATP to TC ATPL. The medical is the first step, you can use your current AME, but have him sign the form in original ink as this is what you need to send to the main Toronto office. They will take a US AME medical and give you a Canadian TC medical. First medical also requires an audiogram and ecg, so you need to get both of those done, by anyone in the US, and send those original reports with your AME original signed form. You then use this medical/license number to apply for the conversion. Then set up a time to write the 20 question test at one of the TC offices. I suggest self study of the TC AIM and the NAV Canada CAP GEN. Google will find you some online stores. I also suggest a short course, 1-3 days, offered by folks like pro ifr in BC. Some places may have conversion specific courses, or some may have ATP courses, anyhow they can be useful right before the test. 20 questions are not many, but it doesn't take getting many wrong to fail either."
     
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