Calling A319/320/321 pilots

///AMG

Well-Known Member
Anyone have any good gouge flashcards or memory study materials for the immediate action/memory items from the QRH? Could make them myself, but if they exist, would love to get a copy. Thanks in advance!
 

CFIT99

I'm probably commenting ironically...
quizlet app is the best one I've seen, just use the search function, there are dozens of airbus study guides for every system.
 

///AMG

Well-Known Member
Come on there’s only 10!
More curious about the format in which they would be read, if queried (if people even do that?). And how to tell what parts are actually memory. My current aircraft has an * next to any memory item, so this seems a little more ambiguous than what I am used to. I'm sure I am probably just missing something that is obvious, yet different.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Most of our memory items are common sense things that are time critical and no time to reach for a book. Like TCAS, EGPWS, Stall, or loss of braking during landing. If those things happen, your actions need to be immediate. Can’t really be reaching for a book and start flipping through pages at this point. That can come later.
Other ones we have are unreliable airspeed, stall warning at liftoff, emergency descent. Same thing. Checklists can come later but these are time critical events that need immediate (memory item) action.

Enjoy the Bus! Ignore the haters (*cough* jtrain), it’s a really nice plane. :)
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Keep in mind, many of those things are company specific. The Airbus standards are far from standard.
Yes. We have like three or so. Basically oxygen mask stuff, loss of braking, unreliable airspeed, or the ”I forget what it’s called” when the plane goes into continuous pitch down and you don’t reeeeeeeally want it to. :)
 

Skåning

Well-Known Member
More curious about the format in which they would be read, if queried (if people even do that?). And how to tell what parts are actually memory. My current aircraft has an * next to any memory item, so this seems a little more ambiguous than what I am used to. I'm sure I am probably just missing something that is obvious, yet different.
I think it's up to the company but our training department isn't strict on verbatim verbiage. More like do the actions and describe them at the same time.

Our memory items are:

EGPWS Alerts
Emer descent
Loss of braking
Stall recovery
Stall recovery at liftoff
TCAS warnings
Unable to maintain altitude/engine failure driftdown
Unreliable speed
Windshear
Windshear ahead (red)

Yes. We have like three or so. Basically oxygen mask stuff, loss of braking, unreliable airspeed, or the ”I forget what it’s called” when the plane goes into continuous pitch down and you don’t reeeeeeeally want it to. :)
Abnormal Veeee alpha prot
 

Nark

Sheepdog
Entirely depends on your company.
To make it really fun, the memory items change at least twice a year at mine. Then they change the flows too.
There is an app a dude I knew created, and maintains. I highly recommend it. It shows what each light or switch does. Very good gouge for orals.



Giggity
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
Anyone have any good gouge flashcards or memory study materials for the immediate action/memory items from the QRH? Could make them myself, but if they exist, would love to get a copy. Thanks in advance!
Don't study anything beyond what you're told to study. Your biggest barriers won't be flying the plane, it'll be how to talk on the radio and figure out how a major airport functions.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
Anyone have any good gouge flashcards or memory study materials for the immediate action/memory items from the QRH? Could make them myself, but if they exist, would love to get a copy. Thanks in advance!
Majors and legacies aren't system intensive.
 

Autothrust Blue

"I’d make a suggestion but you won’t listen”
More curious about the format in which they would be read, if queried (if people even do that?). And how to tell what parts are actually memory. My current aircraft has an * next to any memory item, so this seems a little more ambiguous than what I am used to. I'm sure I am probably just missing something that is obvious, yet different.
This is highly operator specific, but...

Verbatim, of course, unless you are specifically directed otherwise. Our memory items are explicitly laid out in the Cockpit Operating Manual and while “verbatim memorization is not necessary” it saves a lot of trouble if you have them down word for word rather than forcing the APD to drag it out of you.

Our memory limitations are also denoted boldface and your PC starts off with the check airman going between the two of you asking each a sampling (or all of them, depending).

(By the time I’m done cussing and swearing at the start fault, I’m sure the cool down has expired, I promise.)

Majors and legacies aren't system intensive.
We are expected to know what a FAULT light means beyond “there’s a fault” for initial, but yes. I learned a lot more about flight control computer architecture (control and monitor channels) from that Estonian accident report than I did from initial, but it was also all “non-operational,” and I am a nerd.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
We are expected to know what a FAULT light means beyond “there’s a fault” for initial, but yes. I learned a lot more about flight control computer architecture (control and monitor channels) from that Estonian accident report than I did from initial, but it was also all “non-operational,” and I am a nerd.
Long way of saying I'm right.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
True.

I don’t really favor it.
After watching one regional group wrap themselves in knots over useless system knowledge that later turned out to be wrong and forgotten I've kind of come over to the real airlines approach.

Of course I doubt most airlines are too lazy to call the manufacturer and just quote every word from some hind sucking Bombardier test pilot. I can tell it really impressed the morons in the training department hiring the guy the engineers take the tape off the mouth of to get an answer to a question and then reapply a new layer of tape. Pilot probably sold himself as some sort of engineering pilot, when all his job really was meant answering these questions:
"Can you get a plane pepped for me to do a mid level and a high level test, design wants a new antenna mod data tomorrow. Let me give you a couple hints, the answer is yes, and I'm not filling out the paperwork and I'm certainly not going to hear a couple hours of paperwork for a 35 minute flight joke again. No one cares and you're never gonna work for Boeing or be a real pilot."
 

Autothrust Blue

"I’d make a suggestion but you won’t listen”
After watching one regional group wrap themselves in knots over useless system knowledge that later turned out to be wrong and forgotten I've kind of come over to the real airlines approach.
I’ll buy that.

Conversely, not knowing what a certain FDE means, or what a control on the flight deck does and when you’d use it, is probably too “dumb” too.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
I’ll buy that.

Conversely, not knowing what a certain FDE means, or what a control on the flight deck does and when you’d use it, is probably too “dumb” too.
Usually I'd ask, is there a switch for that, but on my plane there probably is so I'm not gonna comment.
 
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