Boeing 737 question

Boltonpilot

New Member
I noticed that Delta has a variety of 737's ranging from the -200, the -300 and the 737-800. Do 737 pilots recieve the training to fly all variants, or does the airline have to become more specific in which pilots fly these models?
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
We have four 737 categories at Delta:

The "73S" category only flies the 737-200 [MCO Only]
The "737" category flies the 737-200 and 737-300 (analog) [SLC/DFW/CVG/ATL]
The "73G" category only flies the 737-300 (glass/efis) [NYC/ATL]
The "73N" category only flies the 737-800 [ATL/NYC/SLC]
 

Mike Lewis

Shadow Administrator
Staff member
Some guy at an airport (who claimed he was somehow affiliated with Delta) told me that the 737-800 used the same avionics as the 757/767, and that if you were type rated in the 757/767, you would also be qualified in the 737-800. Any truth to that?
 

Boltonpilot

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Some guy at an airport (who claimed he was somehow affiliated with Delta) told me that the 737-800 used the same avionics as the 757/767, and that if you were type rated in the 757/767, you would also be qualified in the 737-800. Any truth to that?

[/ QUOTE ]

I don't understand the logic behind that
. The Boeing 737-800 is an aircraft which shares a common type rating with other NG 737's. The boeing 757/767, however, relies on a completley different type rating. Airlines certify pilots in only one type of aircraft, and any other variants which have abundant commonalities. (It's the most practical way in training pilots.) I've learned a bit about this stuff from people at NetJets who I know well in their training department.
 

Mr_Creepy

Well-Known Member
No the type is not the same.

The avionics package, however, is very similar but it is all HIDDEN. To put the EICAS and synopsis pages up there would have requried Herb Kelleher and his Kool-Aid drinkers to do differences training. So Boeing put all the magic behind the panel in the 737NGs (Next Generation).
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Some guy at an airport (who claimed he was somehow affiliated with Delta) told me that the 737-800 used the same avionics as the 757/767, and that if you were type rated in the 757/767, you would also be qualified in the 737-800. Any truth to that?

[/ QUOTE ]

Nope!

Way different.
 

vipermcg

New Member
I read that Austrian Airlines is one of the only airlines in the world to train their pilots to fly both the A320/A330/A340 at the same time.
 

mpenguin1

Well-Known Member
737 type rating covers all 737's, but you will need a differences course to fly the 737 with the glass cockpit, huge difference between the 737-200 vs the 737-600/700/800, that is cockpit wise.

I believe Southwest trains all their pilots in the 737-300 (glass cockpit), and has all the aircraft standardized as much as possible, so that the boys can go both ways.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
The bad thing about SWA is that since their -200s don't have autothrottles, all of the autothrottles fleet-wide have been deactivated. Plus, every jet, even the 'glass/efis' has the 'six pack' of flight instruments.

Here's a SWA/CAL-style glass cockpit:



Here's a AA/DAL-style glass cockpit:



The question I have is whenever SWA gets rid of the old "round-dial" -200s and -300's, are they going to transition to the NG-style of instrumentation to take better advantage of the technology?
 

Cheechako

Well-Known Member
Doug,

Can you switch between the two displays? Can you get the speed and altitude tape display in the SWA/CAL versions?

Here are some side-by-side comparisons. See if you can tell which these are:


--
--

--
--
 

A320_DUDE

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
The bad thing about SWA is that since their -200s don't have autothrottles, all of the autothrottles fleet-wide have been deactivated. Plus, every jet, even the 'glass/efis' has the 'six pack' of flight instruments.

The question I have is whenever SWA gets rid of the old "round-dial" -200s and -300's, are they going to transition to the NG-style of instrumentation to take better advantage of the technology?

[/ QUOTE ]

Just to answer you question Doug.....the entire -300/-500 fleet have the "round dial" gauges....even ol N652 which was the last -300 delivered to the company back in 1998. From what I get from my sources at SWA is a decision was made to keep the "Classic" fleet around for at least 7-12 more years,so the company has started shopping for a vendor to retro fit the older planes with the a NG type flight deck. More that likely it will be a configured like the -700s so they can avoid the costs of training the crews on another configuation. That was the reasoning agaist using the conventional NG displays and since Boeing just LUVs Southwest they came up with the new displays.

As for the autothrottles.....The VP of Flight Ops said the guys are using less fuel without them...so I would'nt see them installed/reactivated anytime soon. Hell why mess with something that's working.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
CAL 737, 767-400/777 and a 737!


(Hint: Look at the yokes)

I don't think you can switch it yourself. But what do I know!
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
Hmmm. Maybe we are starting to update them. I was handing paperwork to the Capt in a -300 the other day, and it had a glass cockpit instead of the guages. Of course we did get a little upset when dispatch decided it would be a good idea to switch out a 737-700 originally planned to go from MCO-SAT to a 737-200. :/
 

Tim

New Member
The pic of the 777 I believe belongs to Delta. Above the center screens is ship # 7003. The 737-300 is one and 767-400 is the other
 

IrishSheepdog

Sitting in the median
In the photos above, the first is a 737-700, the second is a 777, and the third is a 737-800.

I think the comment about the similarities/common type with the 757/767 and the 737-800 was due to the overhead panel. Boeing planned on using an overhead panel which was very similar to the 757 style, however doing so would require 800 and 900 pilots to have a different type rating compared to the current one for the rest of the fleet. As of now, if you get a 737 type rating (say in a -300), you just need to complete differences training to be certified to fly the -700, -800 and -900.

I was at the CAL training center going through a short ground school and sim session on the 737-300 EFIS, and we were permitted to use the CAL computer based training (CBT) programs. It had the general aircraft systems for the -300, -500, and -300 EFIS. Then it had differences sections to learn how the -700, -800, and -900 differed from the rest of the fleet. There are some major differences, but there is also many similarities.

Most of the differences in the "Classic" model 737s and the "NG" model 737s are in automation and pilot displays.

The 767-400 cockpit is arranged simliar to the 777 cockpit displayed above. It has 5 CRT displays across the cockpit. It has the same overhead panel as the older 767s, however. It does not require a new type rating, but like the 737s, requires differences training.
 
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